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The National Road - Ohio - Cambridge to Zanesville

Just west of Cambridge is another of the numerous stone arch 'S' bridges in Ohio.  Built around 1828, the bridge crosses over Peters Creek and is now part of a South Bridge Park.

The Peters Creek 'S' bridge still in use in 1933 (A.S. Burns / Library of Congress)
The Peters Creek S bridge a little overgrown in the early 2000s. (Bee Family)
Continuing west on US 40 and just east of New Concord, another 'S' bridge stands just off of the now heavily beaten path of Route 40.  The bridge is similar to ones located in Claysville and Cambridge; however, this particular bridge has been restored to magnificent condition.  The bridge is known as the Fox Creek 'S' Bridge.  Paved in brick, the bridge, located at the intersection of OH 83 and US 40, has a renewed life that future generations can enjoy.  The Fox Creek Bridge was the last segment of the National Road to be paved in brick in 1919. The National Road from Maryland to Illinois was paved in brick during the 1910s for military vehicles.

A side profile view of the Fox Creek 'S' Bridge. (Mike Kentner)
The Fox Creek Bridge is a striking contrast to modern US 40 nearby. (Mike Austing)
The restored Fox Creek 'S' Bridge and Park near New Concord. (Mike Austing)
New Concord is one of the numerous small Ohio towns along US 40.  It is the birthplace of American Hero, John Glenn, and the home the Muskies of Muskingum College.   
 
The old National Road enters Norwich. (Mike Kentner)
Americans have always been fascinated with travel, the west, and the stories from the two.  In the former stagecoach village of Norwich, The National Road/Zane Grey Museum celebrates this spirit.  The museum features stories about the National Road, the country first 'western route'.  It also documents the life and times of Zanesville native, Zane Grey, who is known as "The Father of the Adult Western."  Across the street from this 'must stop' museum is Baker's Motel.  The motel's original owner, L.B. Baker, donated the land that is now the site of the museum.   

Christopher C. Baldwin monument on Old US 40, Norwich, Ohio. (Mike Kentner)
Unfortunately, one of Norwich's claims to Ohio history is that it is the site of the first recorded traffic fatality in the state's history.  A monument and historical marker along the old highway marks the tragic event.  A plaque on the monument reads, "In Memory of Christopher C. Baldwin, librarian of the American Antiquarian Society Worcester, Mass., killed on this curve Aug. 20, 1835, by the overturning of a stage coach.  This being the first traffic accident on record in this state."  The tablet was placed in Baldwin's honor in 1925, 90 years after his death, by a local Boy Scout Troop.

Leaving Norwich from the west, the old National Pike follows Brick Road.  Here for about a mile, the old highway holds onto its early 20th century heritage as a brick road
Mike Kentner

Mike Kentner
 
Mike Kentner


Mike Kentner

On an old alignment just west of Norwich, the former National Road goes over a stone arch bridge.  This arch bridge appears to be of the same design as those of the famous 'S' bridges built along the highway in the early 1800s.
A stone arch bridge found on a former alignment of the National Road west of Norwich.  (Mike Kentner)


A stone arch bridge found on a former alignment of the National Road west of Norwich.  (Mike Kentner)
One of the oldest cemeteries along the National Road is in Zanesville.  The Greenwood Cemetery was built by the city in 1835.  Originally named 'City Cemetery' until 1885, numerous politicians and other well known local citizens have been buried here.  The stone-arch which serves as the entrance way to the grounds has been standing since 1887.

The over 130 year old arched entrance to Zanesville's Greenwood Cemetery (Mike Austing)

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Comments

Anonymous said…
John Glenn was BORN in Cambridge! His family moved to New Concord soon after.

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