Skip to main content

Disaster Tourism Road Trip Part 3; California State Route 35 from CA 9 north to Great Highway

Originally when I was planning out my trip I wanted to take all of California State Route 35 given it has a single-lane segment of highway.  Unfortunately the single-lane section was wiped out in a mudslide (it still is as I write this on 11/8/17) and I had to settle for CA 35 from CA 9 north to Great Highway in San Francisco.


CA 35 was one of the original Signed State Highways in 1934 but had a number of 5 at the time.  CA 5 was changed to CA 35 in the 1964 State Highway renumbering to avoid a numbering duplication with Interstate 5.  Prior to 1964 CA 5 was part of Legislative Route 55 which was created in 1919.  CA 35 is 54 miles in length stretching from a southern terminus at CA 17 to a northern terminus at CA 1 in San Francisco.

For the most part CA 35 known as Skyline Boulevard and a large portion of the route follows the peaks of the Santa Cruz Range north to San Francisco.  When I arrived at the junction of CA 35 and CA 9 both routes were closed due to slides south to CA 17.


The views along CA 35/Skyline of San Francisco Bay are particularly nice.  CA 35 essentially had no cars on it with all the road closures leading up to it.







Views of the Pacific are a little harder to get from pull-outs but they can be found.





Really there a ton of scenic pull-outs, especially south of CA 84.





There was some minor road damage from from slides on CA 35 approaching CA 84.






North of CA 84 San Francisco starts to come into view as CA 35 begins to lose elevation approaching the city.





I'm not sure how far south the scenic part of CA 35 goes but it does end when the route muliplexes on CA 92 dropping out of the Santa Cruz Range.






There was a detour directing CA 35 north traffic onto I-280 at exit 34.  Normally CA 35 jumps onto I-280 at exit 36 heading north.  For whatever reason the normal route of CA 35 wasn't closed and I used it to hop on I-280.


 



Skyline Boulevard was sectioned up at some point to make way for I-280 between 1970 and 1977.

1970 State Highway Map

1977 State Highway Map

CA 35 jumps off I-280 at exit 41 and widens out to an expressway.




CA 35 briefly becomes a freeway crossing CA 1.  CA 35 continues on Skyline Boulevard along the coast before looping back east to CA 1 on Sloat Boulevard where it terminates.


Since I couldn't do a route clinch I turned off of CA 35 onto Great Highway to take the back way towards the Golden Gate Bridge and downtown.





The change from CA 5 to CA 35 can be seen on the 1963 and 1964 state highway maps.

1963 State Highway Map

1964 State Highway Map

Pretty much everything I talk about with LRN history usually comes from CAhighways.org.  As usual the site has an excellent stub on CA 35.

CAhighways.org on CA 35

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Yes, the color of your nearby fire hydrant matters...

...and here's why. You will find White, Red, Yellow and Violet colored fire hydrants pretty much everywhere.  But there's a reason for this - and it's because of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).  This association has issued guidelines for color coding standards for fire hydrants.  These color codes from the body of the hydrant, top of the hydrant, and in some municipalities the outlet caps are designed to allow fire fighters to know what type of system, water flow rate (Gallons Per Minute or GPM), and level of water pressure.  This guideline is known as NFPA 291 and is intended to be used universally throughout the United States. The NFPA guidelines are specific to the body and the top cap of the hydrant.  If a hydrant is WHITE or YELLOW - it means that it is connected to a public/municipal water system.  If a hydrant is RED - the hydrant is connected to a private system, typically a well.  These are most common in rural or unincorporated areas

Phase 1 of the California State Route 132 West Expressway (in the making since 1947)

On September 15, 2022, the Phase 1 of the California State Route 132 West Expressway opened in the city of Modesto from California State Route 99 west to North Dakota Avenue.  Phase 1 of the California State Route 132 West Expressway was built upon a corridor which was tentatively to designated to become the branching point for Interstate 5W in the 1947 concept of the Interstate Highway System.  The present California State Route 132 West Expressway corridor was adopted by the California Highway Commission on June 20, 1956.  Despite almost being rescinded during the 1970s the concept of the California State Route 132 West Expressway corridor lingered on for over half a century and became likely the oldest undeveloped right-of-way owned by California Transportation Commission.  Pictured above is the planned California State Route 132 freeway west of US Route 99 in Modesto as featured in the May/June 1962 California Highways & Public Works.   The history of the California State Route

Aptos Creek Road to the Loma Prieta ghost town site

Aptos Creek Road is a roadway in Santa Cruz County, California which connects the community of Aptos north to The Forest of Nisene Marks State Parks.  Aptos Creek Road north of Aptos is largely unpaved and is where the town site of Loma Prieta can be located.  Loma Prieta was a sawmill community which operated from 1883-1923 and reached a peak population of approximately three hundred.  Loma Prieta included a railroad which is now occupied by Aptos Creek Road along with a spur to Bridge Creek which now the Loma Prieta Grade Trail.  The site of the Loma Prieta Mill and company town burned in 1942.   Part 1; the history of Aptos Creek Road and the Loma Prieta town site Modern Aptos traces its origin to Mexican Rancho Aptos.  Rancho Aptos was granted by the Mexican Government in 1833 Rafael Castro.  Rancho Aptos took its name from Aptos Creek which coursed through from the Santa Cruz Mountains to Monterey Bay.  Castro initially used Rancho Aptos to raise cattle for their hides.  Following