Skip to main content

NCTA releases Mid-Currituck Bridge Draft Environmental Impact Statement

On March 31st, the North Carolina Turnpike Authority released their Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) and recommended alternative for the Mid-Currituck Bridge

Of the three alternatives that saw the most scrutinization, the NCTA has recommended Option MCB4 to be built.  However, the Turnpike Authority has yet to decide on alignment 'C1' or 'C2' at the eastern end of the bridge.  The eastern terminus of the bridge will be at NC 12 in or near Corolla.  Option C1 lands at the southern end of Corolla Bay and about two miles north of the Albacore Street retail area.  Option C2 avoids Corolla Bay and meets NC 12 about a half mile south of Albacore Street.

In addition, the NCTA has yet to decide on the location of the toll booths on the mainland (US 158) side of the bridge.  The decision on the location of the toll booths has become a double edged sword as potential impacts to Maple Swamp and the Currituck Sound community of Aydlett has cause the most controversy.   NCTA has not released a timeline on when they will make a decision on options 'C1' and 'C2' or the mainland toll booths location.

Also, MCB4 will include the construction of a third 'contraflow' hurricane evacuation lane on US 158 from the bridge northwards to NC 168.  There would also be some widening of NC 12 in Corolla where the bridge ends, but the length of the widening will be determined by the ultimate eastern terminus of the bridge.  Finally, a recommendation to convert the NC 12/US 158 intersection in Southern Shores to an interchange (either a SPUI or compressed diamond) was made.  However, funding at this time is not available for that project.

The Turnpike Authority will be hosting public hearings on the DEIS in May.  The schedule for the meetings is as follows:
  • May 18 - Ramada Plaza, Nags Head
  • May 19 - Outer Banks Center for Wildlife Education, Corolla 
  • May 20 - Currituck Cooperative Extension Center, Barco
Each hearing will begin with an open house starting at 3:30 pm, immediately followed by the public hearing at 7:00 pm.

The new target completion date for the bridge is now late 2014.

Story Links:
Mid-Currituck Bridge Draft Environmental Impact Statement ---North Carolina Turnpike Authority
Statement recommends Currituck bridge option ---Outer Banks Voice
Turnpike Authority Schedules Public Meetings for Bridge Project ---Carova Corner

Comments

Da-ud said…
Wouldn't a rotary at the US 158/NC 12 intersection be less environmentally intrusive than an interchange?

Popular posts from this blog

Sunshine Bridge (Donaldsonville, LA)

Located about halfway between Baton Rouge and New Orleans in southern Louisiana, the Sunshine Bridge spans the lower Mississippi River near the city of Donaldsonville as part of the longer Louisiana Highway 70 corridor, which connects Interstate 10 and Airline Highway (US 61) with US 90 in Morgan City. In the years following World War II, the only bridges across the lower Mississippi River in Louisiana were located in the area of the state’s two largest cities – Baton Rouge and New Orleans. Postwar agricultural and industrial development along the river in this region led to the planning of a series of infrastructure projects in southern Louisiana that were aimed at spurring this development and modernization of the Delta region. One of these projects was known as the Acadian Thruway and was developed in the 1950s as a toll road intended to connect greater New Orleans with Lafayette and points west while providing a high-speed bypass of the Baton Rouge metro area. The Thruway, which

Old River Lock & Control Structure (Lettsworth, LA)

  The Old River Control Structure (ORCS) and its connecting satellite facilities combine to form one of the most impressive flood control complexes in North America. Located along the west bank of the Mississippi River near the confluence with the Red River and Atchafalaya River nearby, this structure system was fundamentally made possible by the Flood Control Act of 1928 that was passed by the United States Congress in the aftermath of the Great Mississippi River Flood of 1927 however a second, less obvious motivation influenced the construction here. The Mississippi River’s channel has gradually elongated and meandered in the area over the centuries, creating new oxbows and sandbars that made navigation of the river challenging and time-consuming through the steamboat era of the 1800s. This treacherous area of the river known as “Turnbull’s Bend” was where the mouth of the Red River was located that the upriver end of the bend and the Atchafalaya River, then effectively an outflow

Natchez-Vidalia Bridge (Natchez, MS)

  Located about halfway between Baton Rouge and Vicksburg near the city of Natchez, the Natchez-Vidalia Bridge crosses the lower Mississippi River between southwest Mississippi and northeastern Louisiana at the city of Vidalia. This river crossing is a dual span, which creates an interesting visual effect that is atypical on the Mississippi River in general. Construction on the original bridge took place in the late 1930s in conjunction with a much larger parallel effort by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to strengthen the area’s flood protection and levee system along the Mississippi River. One of the more ambitious aspects of this plan was to relocate the city of Vidalia to a location of higher ground about one mile downriver from the original settlement. The redirection of the river through the Natchez Gorge (which necessitated the relocation of the town) and the reconstruction of the river’s levee system in the area were undertaken in the aftermath of the Great Flood of 1927, wh