Skip to main content

MUMPO leader offers ways to fund both I-485 and Independence Blvd construction

Lee Myers, who chairs the Mecklenburg-Union Metropolitan Planning Organization (MUMPO), recently wrote a letter to North Carolina Governor Beverly Perdue with suggestions on how the state can fund both the completion of Interstate 485 and continue the upgrading of Independence Blvd.

Myers wrote to Governor Perdue suggesting various ways to fund both projects and get them done as quickly as possible. The sources would include - current funds allocated for the projects, money from the second wave of funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, bond money, and moving funding from other projects within the state.

Lee asks the Governor to "think outside the box" in coming up with funding sources to complete both projects. This is the second letter that Myers has written to Governor Perdue and Secretary of Transportation Eugene Conti in regards to using stimulus funds for I-485.

In a letter dated, April 30, 2009, Myers wrote that though MUMPO voted to use stimulus funds on other projects in the region (including an NC 73 project in Huntersville), the organization was open to using stimulus funds for I-485 if the Governor and NCDOT showed that they had "...a viable funding plan for I-485...that requires the use of [stimulus] funds."

In that letter, Lee stated that this would be readdressed in July - given that the Governor and NCDOT would show that they could build I-485 without delaying another project.

Myers states in his current letter that moving money from other projects would not delay them but only impact the timing the funds are received.

Story:
Local leaders press governor on I-485 ---WCNC-TV w/video

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Former California State Route 198 at the bottom of Lake Kaweah

East of Lemon Cove of Tulare County one can find several old alignments of California State Route 198 at the bottom of the Lake Kaweah Reservoir.  In particularly dry years these early alignments of California State Route 198 can be accessed as hiking trails.   Part 1; a brief history of California State Route 198 in the Lake Kaweah Reservoir The current corridor of California State Route 198 ("CA 198") in Lake Kaweah has a lengthy history.  The present corridor around Lake Kaweah first became a popular route of travel for European settlers during the mining boom of Mineral King Valley.   Through the 1860s prospectors arrived in Mineral King Valley by way of the Kaweah River and East Fork Kaweah River.  In 1870 John Lovelace and his family built a stock trail up to what was known as Milk Ranch on the East Fork Kaweah River.  The Lovelace extended their trail all the way up to Mineral King Valley and the prospector camp sites.  In 1871 the stock trail was greatly improved

New River Gorge National River Area To Become A National Park

Great news for those that enjoy National Parks, West Virginia's New River Gorge Region, or West Virginia tourism.  Included within the Fiscal Year 2021 Omnibus Appropriations Bill signed by President Trump last night (December 27th) is the New River Gorge Park and Preserve Designation Act.   The act will designate the existing New River National River and over 72,000 acres of land within it as a National Park and Preserve. The New River Gorge Bridge will continue to be the centerpiece of the new New River Gorge National Park and Preserve. (Adam Prince, 2007) The river and surrounding land, which was added to the National Park System in 1978, will be our 63rd National Park.   The designation preserves over 7,000 acres as a National Park.  This area will not allow any hunting.  The remaining 65,000 acres of the existing park will be designated as a preserve allowing hunting and fishing. The main attractions to the New River Gorge - whitewater rafting, camping, hiking, mountain bikin

Legend of the Ridge Route; a history of crossing the mountains between the Los Angeles Basin and San Joaquin Valley from wagon trails to Interstates

Over the past two decades I've crossed the Interstate 5 corridor from Los Angeles north over the Sierra Pelona Mountains and Tehachapi Range to San Joaquin Valley what seems to be an immeasurable number of times.  While Interstate 5 from Castaic Junction to Grapevine via Tejon Pass today is known to most as "The Grapevine" it occupies a corridor which has been traversed by numerous historic highways.  The most notable of these highways is known as the "Ridge Route."  This article is dedicated to the Ridge Route and the various highways that preceded it.  The Ridge Route is a 44 mile section of highway which was completed in 1915.  The Ridge Route originally stretched from Castaic Junction north over Liebre Summit and Tejon Pass to the tiny community of Grapevine.  In spite of a roadway that once utilized nearly 700 curves the Ridge Route is generally considered far ahead of it's time and one of the first modern highways in California constructed for auto