Skip to main content

Could the NCTA be absorbed by NCDOT?

Well, a North Carolina State House measure may just do that. By 113-4 margin the NC State House approved a merger of the two agencies. A similar measure was ok'd by the State Senate when they approved their version of the state budget.

The merger is seen as a cost saving move in a state that faces an approximate $1.6 billion shortfall. However, it is unknown how much of a savings the merger of the two agencies would provide.

If the measure remains in the budget, the NCTA would report to the sitting NC Secretary of Transportation. However, the NCTA would continue working on toll projects throughout the state and any funding for the toll projects would not be impacted.

Story:
DOT to take over Turnpike Authority ---The Daily Advance

Commentary:
Not even five years after it was created as a separate entity - could this be the end of the NCTA? Of course, its projects would go on - but the agency would be under the supervision of the DOT.

I don't have an issue with the NCTA going under the responsibilities of NCDOT - but considering the multitude of errors made by NCDOT in this decade - will there actually be any efficiencies gained from this?

And finally, though it is said currently that none of the NCTA funding for their various projects would change as a result of the merger - the article is specific to the Mid-Currituck Bridge - I just don't see that happening as long as the state is in the red.

Comments

Anonymous said…
This was the plan all the time. This allowed the poorly planned toll projects which were in the TIP for the late 2020's jump to the head of the line and gobble up the funding for all the other local projects and even take the money that had been illegally transferred from the Highway Trust Fund for the "gaps". Most of the original toll projects were low balled in cost to get the TPA started. Once the TPA was formed all of them grew in cost astronmically. Cape Fear Skyway was originally on the TIP for around 2030 and is a great example. Its estimated cost in 2004 was $350 million. It is now in 2009 listed between $1.1 and $1.5 billion. If the past is any indication that means $1.5 billion. "Gap" is now bigger than the cost of the bridge. But guess what, it is now the number one project on the WMPO TIP. If that is not bad enough now the TPA wants to toll a project that was never under their mandate from the legislature as a toll project, namely, the I-140 bypass of Wilmington. The I-140 bypass is funded in the TIP without tolls, so why should it be tolled to pay for another project that doesn't justify its existence financially. Current estimates are that tolls will only pay about 40% of the cost fo the bridge. Does that qualify as truly needed? Could there be other alternatives that would work just as well and be much less expensive?

Popular posts from this blog

The history of US Route 80 and Interstate 8 in California

The historic corridor of US Route 80 and Interstate 8 through the borderlands of southern California share a largely mutual history.  Both highways originated in the city of San Diego and departed the state at the Colorado River into Yuma, Arizona.  Both highways share numerous famous geographical components such as the Mountain Springs Grade and Algodones Sand Dunes.  This article serves as a comprehensive history of the combined US Route 80/Interstate 8 corridor in California from the tolled stage route era of the nineteenth century to the development of the modern freeway.   The blog cover photo features US Route 80 along the Mountains Springs Grade through In-Ko-Pah Gorge during late 1920s.  This photo is part of the Caltrans McCurry Collection. Part 1; the history of US Route 80 and Interstate 8 in California US Route 80 and Interstate 8 in California share a largely mutual history.  The backstory of both highways is tied heavily to the corridors of the Old Spanish Trail, Legisl

The Central Freeway of San Francisco (US Route 101)

The Central Freeway is a 1.2-mile elevated limited access corridor in the city of San Francisco.  As presently configured the Central Freeway connects from the end of the Bayshore Freeway to Market Street.  The Central Freeway carries the mainline of northbound US Route 101 from the Bayshore Freeway to Mission Street. The Central Freeway has origins with the establishment of Legislative Route Number 223 and is heavily tied to the history of the once proposed Panhandle Freeway.  The Central Freeway between the Bayshore Freeway and Mission Street was completed during 1955.  The corridor was extended to a one-way couplet located at Turk Street and Golden Gate Avenue in 1959 which served to connect US Route 101 to Van Ness Avenue.  The Central Freeway was damaged by the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and has since been truncated to Market Street.   The Central Freeway as pictured on the blog cover was featured in the May/June 1959 California Highways & Public Works.  The scan below is fro

The Midway Palm and Pine of US Route 99

Along modern day California State Route 99 south of Avenue 11 just outside the City limits of Madera one can find the Midway Palm and Pine in the center median of the freeway.  The Midway Palm and Pine denotes the halfway point between the Mexican Border and Oregon State Line on what was US Route 99.  The Midway Palm is intended to represent Southern California whereas the Midway Pine is intended to represent Northern California.  Pictured above the Midway Palm and Pine can be seen from the northbound lanes of the California State Route 99 Freeway.   This blog is part of the larger Gribblenation US Route 99 Page.  For more information pertaining to the other various segments of US Route 99 and it's three-digit child routes check out the link the below. Gribblenation US Route 99 Page The history of the Midway Palm and Pine The true timeframe for when the Midway Palm and Pine (originally a Deadora Cedar Tree) were planted is unknown.  In fact, the origin of the Midway Palm and Pine w