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Zigzagging through Eastern NC

Took one more weekend trip today. This time it was all over Northeastern NC. The main purpose was to get photos of some of the missing NC Highway Ends.

Route: I-540, US 264, US 264A, NC 581, US 64A, US 64 Business, US 64, I-95, NC 43, NC 48, NC 481, NC 561, US 258, NC/VA 35, VA/NC 186, US 301, NC 48, NC/VA 48, Va. Secondary 611 and 659, US 58, VA 4, US Bike 1.

Whew.

Accomplishments: Clinched NC 481. Added miles to: NC 43, NC 4, NC 48, NC 581, NC 561, US 258, NC/VA 35, NC/VA 46.

Notes:

Over 50 photos on the trip. Of course, head over to flickr, if you want to see 'em all!

At the crossroads of Glenview, which is the Western Terminus of NC 481, is this old abandoned B.M. Sykes General Merchandise store.

A few years ago, a short NC 481 bypass was built to the south of Enfield. The reason was to bypass the heavily traveled train crossing through the center of town. Well, here's proof of why.

At NC 481's East end in Tillery was a great former gas station.


Who would've thunk that $3.19/gallon gas would be so cheap!

Here's a sign shot I like in Pendleton, NC.

I was able to get all the missing ends I targeted on this trip except one. NC 186 where it crosses the NC/VA line. There wasn't a great spot to pull over, and my windshield was all buggy to where I couldn't take a shot while driving. Oh well.

Did you know that Brunswick County, Virginia is the "Original Home of Brunswick Stew"?

Well now you do.

Surprised that there wasn't a VA 46 North shield until about five miles after crossing the state line.

VA 4 is a short route that runs from US 58 (between South Hill and Boydton) to the North Carolina State line becoming a secondary road. Now, that would normally make it worth possibly a yawn or two. But, there are a few nice things about this road. First, it provides access to the very popular Kerr Lake Recreation Area. Second, it is a rare highway that crosses on top of a dam.

And finally...views like these.


And even the Southern Terminus is a little more than non-descript, as it is also the state line crossing of US Bike 1. And upon entering both states, the Bike Route gets mentioned.


All in all, a pretty good trip. I got all but the 186 end...and I got a number of new NC Crossroads photos. If only, I can figure out how to create it.

Comments

Doug said…
Kerr Lake... I'm not related to that Kerr.
lisavanews said…
love your blog :)

I am in Union Level Virginia and the bike route is awesome to watch so many bikers ride through here

you pointed out some interesting perspectives about our area

http://www.youtube.com/user/lisavanews
http://picasaweb.google.com/lisa.va.news
Anonymous said…
you arent too worried about gas prices with all these road trips

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