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NCDOT begins thinking on upgrading US 64

NCDOT is looking at ways to upgrade and improve traffic flow on a 19 mile stretch of US 64 from Cary to Pittsboro, and they will be holding two community workshops in May for residential input.

The current study is looking at ways to improve US 64 into a freeway or an expressway or a combination of both over the next 30 years.

One of the key issues is the improved highway's environmental impact along with citizen's access to the popular Jordan Lake State Recreation Area. In addition, access to and from existing and future shopping centers and residential developments along US 64 will be a topic of discussion.

The US 64 corridor in upcoming years will also see the addition of an interchange with the Triangle Expressway (NC 540).

Currently, a small part of US 64 in Cary is already considered an expressway by the state.

In addition to the long term improvements, the DOT is looking at intersections where the 'superstreet' concept can be installed. The modified intersection that is designed to eliminate most left turns can be found in Chapel Hill, Brunswick County, and non-signalized versions can be found on US 1 near Vass.

The 19 mile US 64 corridor is part of North Carolina's Strategic Highway Corridor Program. The program consists of 55 highway corridors aiming to provide a network of high-speed, safe, reliable highways throughout the state. The section of US 64 is part of SHC Corridor 26 (Charlotte to Raleigh) which consists of NC 49 from Charlotte to Asheboro and US 64 from Asheboro to Raleigh.

NCDOT introduced a new website in March 2008 and can be accessed here.

The two meetings will be held at Apex High School on Monday, May 19 and Northwood High School in Pittsboro on Tuesday, May 20. Both meetings will be held from 5 to 8 pm.

NCDOT plans to have a second round of meetings and community input sometime in October.

Story: Raleigh News & Observer

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