Skip to main content

Small Towns of Virginia Series - Pound

Downtown Pound, Virginia
Just south of the Kentucky State Line along US 23 is the Town of Pound.  This Mountain Empire town of nearly 1,000 is a sample of many of the small towns in this region - tucked away within the folds of the numerous hills and mountains of the area and not a straight road to be found.

The Pound Hardware & Furniture Company building is now home to a hodgepodge of different shops.
Pound sits along Virginia's Crooked Road - a meandering journey through Southwest Virginia highlighting and celebrating the regions connection to Americana and Bluegrass Music.  Pound celebrates its piece of Bluegrass Heritage 7:00 pm every Thursday night at the Pound Town Hall Building.  "Pickin' in the Pound" features local bluegrass musicians and southwest Virginia hospitality.

Until 2011, Pound was home to the Pound High School Wildcats.  That year, Wise County consolidated Pound HS with Wise's J.J. Kelly High School to form Central High School in Norton.  The new Central High School would open in 2013.  From my visit there in 2008, Pound was very proud of their high school.

This local store displays Pound High School Wildcat Pride

Pound sits along the Pound River and is served by US 23 and Virginia Route 83.  The planned Coalfields Expressway - which will run from Beckley, WV southwest to Pound - will have its southern terminus here.  There is no timetable for completion for this road.

The Pixie Drive-In was for sale by owner in 2008; however, it is still there and under new ownership.
Site Navigation:

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Central Freeway of San Francisco (US Route 101)

The Central Freeway is a 1.2-mile elevated limited access corridor in the city of San Francisco.  As presently configured the Central Freeway connects from the end of the Bayshore Freeway to Market Street.  The Central Freeway carries the mainline of northbound US Route 101 from the Bayshore Freeway to Mission Street. The Central Freeway has origins with the establishment of Legislative Route Number 223 and is heavily tied to the history of the once proposed Panhandle Freeway.  The Central Freeway between the Bayshore Freeway and Mission Street was completed during 1955.  The corridor was extended to a one-way couplet located at Turk Street and Golden Gate Avenue in 1959 which served to connect US Route 101 to Van Ness Avenue.  The Central Freeway was damaged by the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and has since been truncated to Market Street.   The Central Freeway as pictured on the blog cover was featured in the May/June 1959 California Highways & Public Works.  The scan below is fro

The Bayshore Freeway (US Route 101)

The Bayshore Freeway is a 56.4-mile component of US Route 101 located in the San Francisco Bay Area.  The Bayshore Freeway connects the southern extent of San Jose to the Central Freeway in the city of San Francisco.  The corridor was originally developed as the Bayshore Highway between 1923 and 1937.  The Bayshore Highway would serve briefly as mainline US Route 101 before being reassigned as US Route 101 Bypass in 1938.  Conceptually the designs for the Bayshore Freeway originated in 1940 but construction would be delayed until 1947.  The Bayshore Freeway was completed by 1962 and became mainline US Route 101 during June 1963.   Part 1; the history of the Bayshore Freeway Prior the creation of the Bayshore Highway corridor the most commonly used highway between San Jose and San Francisco was El Camino Real (alternatively known as Peninsula Highway).  The  American El Camino Real  began as an early example of a signed as an Auto Trail starting in 1906.  The era of State Highway Mainte

Former US Route 101 and California State Route 41 through Paso Robles

Paso Robles is a city located on the Salinas River of San Luis Obispo County, California.  As originally configured the surface alignments of US Route 101 and California State Route 41 converged in downtown Paso Robles.  US Route 101 originally was aligned through Paso Robles via Spring Street.  California State Route 41 entered the City of Paso Robles via Union Road and 13th Street where it intersected US Route 101 at Spring Street.  US Route 101 and California State Route 41 departed Paso Robles southbound via a multiplex which split near Templeton.   Pictured above is the cover of the September/October 1957 California Highways & Public Works which features construction of the Paso Robles Bypass.  Pictured below is the 1935 Division of Highways Map of San Luis Obispo County which depicts US Route 101 and California State Route 41 intersecting in downtown Paso Robles.   Part 1; the history of US Route 101 and California State Route 41 in Paso Robles Paso Robles ("Pass of the