Skip to main content

Small Towns of Virginia Series - Millwood

Quiet Store and Homefronts in Millwood
Hidden away from the modern highway that carries routes 17 and 50 sits the small community of Millwood, a community that dates for over 200 years.  Millwood's lifeblood for numerous decades was the Burwell-Morgan Mill completed in 1785 by Colonel Nathaniel Burwell and Daniel Morgan.   The mill ran as a commercial operation until 1953.  The mill served as a merchant mill providing various milled goods to local residents. The mill is open to visitors Thursdays through Sundays from May to October.  Besides being a museum of the mill's past, the mill also serves as the location of artwork and art shows for local artisans.  This program is known as "Art at the Mill".

The Burwell-Morgan Mill has recently been restored to 1780s conditions and machinery.
Millwood is known for its many antique shops, bed-and-breakfast's, and general stores.  Many of the structures in Millwood are old frame houses with various stone facades and lined with limestone fences.  The Clark House, built in 1842, was a meeting place during the negotiations of Confederate Colonel John Mosby's surrender.

One of the many centuries old stone buildings in Millwood
Millwood is located in Clarke County.  It can be reached easily from Winchester and Washington.  From the East or West via US 17/50, Millwood is easily reached via VA Route 255.  From the North or South via US 340, Millwood can be reached from Route 723 in Boyce.

Site Navigation:

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Former California State Route 1 over Old Pedro Mountain Road

California State Route 1 in western San Mateo County traverses the Montara Mountain spur of the Santa Cruz Mountains.  In modern times California State Route 1 passes through Montara Mountain via the Tom Lantos Tunnels and the highway is traditionally associated with Devils Slide.  Although Devils Slide carries an infamous legacy due it being prone landslides it pales in comparison to the alignment California State Route 1 carried prior to November 1937 over Old Pedro Mountain Road.   Old Pedro Mountain Road opened to traffic in 1915 and is considered one of the first major asphalted highways in California.  Old Pedro Mountain Road clambers over a grade from Montara towards Pacifica via the 922 foot high Saddle Pass.  Pictured above an overlook of Old Pedro Mountain Road facing southward towards Montara as it appears today.  Pictured below it the same view during June 1937 when it was part of the original alignment of California State Route 1.  Today Old Pedro Mountain sits abandoned a

Former US Route 101 and California State Route 1 in San Luis Obispo

Originally US Route 101 upon descending Cuesta Pass southbound entered the City of San Luis Obispo via Monterey Street.  From Monterey Street US Route 101 utilized Santa Rosa Street and Higuera Street southbound through downtown San Luis Obispo.  Upon departing downtown San Luis Obispo US Route 101 would have stayed on Higuera Street southward towards Pismo Beach and Arroyo Grande.  Notably; beginning in 1934 US Route 101 picked up California State Route 1 at the intersection of Monterey Street/Santa Rosa Street where the two would multiplex to Pismo Beach.  Pictured below is the 1 935 Division of Highways Map of San Luis Obispo County depicting the original alignments of US Route 101 and California State Route 1 in the City of San Luis Obispo.   Part 1; the history of US Route 1 and California State Route 1 in San Luis Obispo San Luis Obispo lies at the bottom of the Cuesta Pass (also known as the Cuesta Grade) which has made it favored corridor of travel for centuries.  Cuesta Pass

California State Route 232

This past month I drove the entirety of California State Route 232 in Ventura County. CA 232 is an approximately 4 miles State Highway aligned on Vineland Avenye which begins near Saticoy at CA 118 and traverses southwest to US Route 101 in Oxnard.  The alignment of CA 232 was first adopted into the State Highway System in 1933 as Legislative Route Number 154 according to CAhighways.org. CAhighways.org on LRN 154 As originally defined LRN 154 was aligned from LRN 9 (future CA 118) southwest to LRN 2/US 101 in El Rio.  This configuration of LRN 154 between CA 118/LRN 9 and US 101/LRN 2 can be seen on the 1935 California Division of Highways Map of Ventura County. 1935 Ventura County Highway Map According to CAhighways.org the route of LRN 154 was extended west from US 101/LRN 2 to US 101A/LRN 60 in 1951.  Unfortunately State Highway Maps do not show this extension due to it being extremely small. During the 1964 State Highway Renumbering LRN 154 was assigned CA 232.  Of n