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A Visit to Lynchburg, Tennessee - Home to the Jack Daniels Distillery


When most Americans think of Lynchburg, Tennessee, the first thing that comes to mind is Jack Daniel's Tennessee Whiskey. For over a century, this small sleepy Southern Tennessee village has been home to one of America's beloved treasures - all while being within a DRY county - Moore County. And while hundreds of thousands visit the distillery every year, more are surprised by and will never forget the welcomeness and hospitality of the small town it resides in.

The over 100-year-old Moore County Courthouse is the centerpiece of Lynchburg Town Square.

Lynchburg and Moore County is genuinely rural - full of rolling hills and farmlands that offer spectacular views everywhere you turn. The town of Lynchburg is quaint, highlighted by the Moore County Courthouse and town square. There's a small general store, several diners, cafes, and an antique store in just about every direction you turn. Of course, Jack Daniel's merchandise and memorabilia can be found in town as well.


Jack Daniels Distillery Tour:


The highlight of any visit to Lynchburg is a tour of the Jack Daniel's Distillery.   Various tours showcase how Jack Daniel's Tennessee Whiskey is made, aged, and stored.  Tours range from one hour to three hours in length and vary in cost from $20 to $100.  Of course, all tours include plenty of history and numerous home-spun stories, as all of the tour guides are employees of Jack Daniel's. The hour-long tour is relaxing, enjoyable, and leaves visitors very impressed with the history and traditions in making Jack Daniel's.

The Rickyard - where a slow process of making wood fired charcoal is done.

As said earlier, Moore County is a dry county - meaning no alcohol can be sold within the county lines. However, the distillery has permission to sell various labels of their whiskey to the general public.

Walking from the Cave Spring to where the whiskey is made. If you look at the top of the hill in the photo, there sits one of the numerous barrel houses that stores the whiskey


All photos taken by post author - March 21, 2008.

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