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The Peachoid

For nearly 40 years, travelers along Interstate 85 near Gaffney, South Carolina have contemplated the design of a landmark water tower at mile marker 91.  Is it a peach or does it look like someone's rear end?
The Peachoid - what does it look like to you - a baby's behind or a peach?
The Gaffney Peachoid - a 135 foot water tower - has towered over Interstate 85 in Cherokee County since 1981.  Built as a necessity for the Town of Gaffney - designed as a reminder that Cherokee County and South Carolina is the largest producer of peaches in the South (not Georgia) - the Peachoid has attracted curious travelers to stop since the day it first appeared.

At a cost of $950,000, the tower took five months to complete and holds 1,000,000 gallons of water.  Fifty gallons of paint spanning twenty different colors later, the uniquely designed water tank became a giant peach - or if you prefer, a derriere.  The tower even received an award.  The Steel Tank of the Year for 1981 by the Steel Plate Fabricators Association.  In 2015, a refurbishing project gave the Peachoid a fresh coat of paint.

The Peachoid gained even greater notoriety when it was the focal point of Season 1 - Chapter 3 of the Netflix drama, House of Cards.  The added attention unfortunately led to an increase in petty vandalism at the site (name carving in the metal, graffiti).  In turn, the Town of Gaffney erected a six foot tall security fence around The Peachoid and closed the site at night.

All photos taken by post author - March 20, 2019

Further Reading:

How To Get There:
The Peachoid is easily accessible from either Exit 90 or 92 on Interstate 85.  Peachoid Road is the frontage road that leads to the tower.  Parking can either be at the Peachoid or at the Fatz CafĂ© next door.


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