Skip to main content

Paper Highways; California State Route 64 the unbuilt Malibu Canyon-Whitnall Freeway

This issue of Paper Highways examines the history of unbuilt California State Route 64; the Malibu-Whitnall Freeway.



The History of unbuilt California State Route 64 and the Malibu Canyon-Whitnall Freeway

CA 64 is an unbuilt freeway which would have originated at CA 1 near Malibu in Los Angeles County.  CA 64 was intended ascend the Santa Monica Mountains northward via Malibu Creek where it would have briefly entered Ventura County near Calabasas (this segment would have been known as the Malibu Canyon Freeway).  CA 64 from the Ventura County line would have swung east to the junction of I-5/Golden State Freeway and CA 170/Hollywood Freeway (this segment was to be named the Whitnall Freeway).  CA 64 if constructed would have been about 30 miles in length.




According to CAhighways.org the origin of CA 64 can be traced back to 1958 when plans for the Whitnall Freeway were announced.  The Whitnall Freeway was named after a Los Angeles City Planner by the name of Gordon Whitnall.  Gordon Whitnall had a major hand in roadway development in the City of Los Angeles during the early 20th Century.  The planned Whitnall Freeway was adopted into the State Highway System in 1959 as part of Legislative Route 265.

LRN 265 was originally intended to end at CA 1 via the corridor of Malibu Canyon Road.  LRN 265 was to have ended at US 99/LRN 4 at the planned route of the Golden State Freeway.  LRN 265 can be seen for the first time on the 1960 Division of Highways State Map.


According to CAhighways.org the route of LRN 265 through the Santa Monica Mountains was first studied in 1963.  LRN 265 was reassigned as CA 64 during the 1964 State Highway Renumber.  CA 64 can be seen for the first time on the 1964 Division of Highways State Map.  CA 64 is shown to having a planned terminus at I-5/US 99 on the Golden State Freeway and a junction with CA 170 on the planned Hollywood Freeway extension. 


The Malibu Canyon-Whitnall Freeway appears in the March/April 1965 California Highways & Public Works Guide in an article regarding planning studies.





The Malibu Canyon-Whitnall Freeway alignment is shown to have been discussed by the California Highway Commission on June 8th 1966 in the November-December 1966 California Highways & Public Works Guide.


The planned route of CA 64 is shown to have been shifted to a terminus at a mutual junction with the Hollywood Freeway and Golden State Freeway on the 1967 Division of Highways State Map.


The 1967 Division of Highways Map shows CA 64 to have an adopted alignment from CA 1 at Malibu Cree north of Calabasas.


The planned junction of CA 1 and CA 64 at Malibu Creek is shown in a 2015 Malibu Surf article.


The entire route of CA 64 is shown to have a fully adopted alignment on the 1969 Division of Highways State Map.



According to CAhighways CA 64 between CA 1 and US 101 was deleted from the Freeway & Expressway System during November 1970.  The alignment of CA 64 between US 101 and I-5/CA 170 was rescinded by the California Transportation Commission during July 1973.  The reminder of CA 64 between US 101 and CA 170/I-5 was deleted from the Freeway & Expressway System during January of 1976.  CA 64 appears without an adopted alignment on the 1975 Caltrans State Map.


Despite having it's adopted alignment abandoned long ago the State Legislative has yet to delete CA 64.  CA 64 still appears as a planned highway on the 2005 Caltrans Map.



Had the Malibu Canyon-Whitnall Freeway been constructed it's approach from I-5 south would have likely been a split junction with CA 170/Hollywood Freeway.  One can almost imagine CA 64 been co-signed with CA 170 at an Exit from I-5 south.





Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The rogue G28-2 California State Highway Spades

In this short blog we look at the somewhat rare but not unheard-of rogue G28-2 California State Highway Spades affixed to guide signs. Part 1; what is the G28-2 California State Highway Spade?  The  Caltrans Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices Sign Chart from 2014  ("Caltrans MUTCD") dictates the types of signs and highway shields permitted for traffic control use in California.  California is known for it's more ornate cut-out shields which are used for, US Routes, Interstate Highways, and State Routes.  These shields are intended to be applied as standalone reassurance signs but aren't explicitly limited to said function and occasionally appear in error on guide signs.  The common shields which are typically found through California are: US Route:  G26-2 Interstate:  G27-2 State Highway:  G28-2 The Caltrans MUTCD provides alternative shields for, US Routes, Interstate Highways, and State Routes.  These alternative shields are intended for guide sign usage.  Th

Former Greater Pittsburgh International Airport Terminal

For just over four decades, the former main terminal of Greater Pittsburgh International Airport was the city's gateway to the world.  Located nearly 20 miles west of Downtown Pittsburgh, the Joseph Hoover-designed terminal would see millions of travelers pass through its doors.  Known best for the terrazzo compass in the main lobby, the terminal had many other distinguishing features.  The well-landscaped entrance led up to the curved stepped design of the terminal. Each level of the terminal would extend out further than the other allowing for numerous observation decks.  The most popular observation deck, the "Horizon Room", was located on the fourth floor. The former Greater Pittsburgh Airport Terminal - October 1998 From when it opened in the Summer of 1952 until its closing on September 30, 1992, the terminal would grow from a small regional airport to the main hub for USAir.  The terminal would see numerous expansions and renovations over its 40 years of

Highways in and around Old Sacramento; US 40, US 99W, CA 16, CA 24, CA 70, CA 99, CA 275, and more

This past weekend I was visiting the City of Sacramento for a wedding.  That being the case I decided to head out on a morning run through Old Sacramento, Jibboom Street Bridge, I Street Bridge, Tower Bridge, and path of US Route 40/US Route 99W towards the California State Capitol.  My goal was to retrace the paths of the various highways that once traversed the Old Sacramento area. This blog is part of the larger Gribblenation US Route 99 Page.  For more information pertaining to the other various segments of US Route 99 and it's three-digit child routes check out the link the below. Gribblenation US Route 99 Page The old highway alignments of Sacramento The City of Sacramento lies at the confluence of the Sacramento River and American River in Sacramento Valley.  Sacramento Valley was discovered by Spanish Explorer Gabriel Moraga in 1808.  Moraga referred to the fertile Sacramento Valley akin to a "Blessed Sacrament."  By 1839 John Sutter Sr. settled in Mexican held