Skip to main content

Florida State Road 50 Part 2; Sumter County

Picking up from Part 1 of the Florida State Road 50 series Part 2 covers the sections of the highway headed eastward within Sumter County.


Part 1 of the Florida State Road 50 series can be found below:

Florida State Road Part 1; history of the highway and Hernando County portion

As stated in Part 1 the route of FL 50 east enters the Green Swamp in eastern Hernando County.  At the Little Withlacoochee the route of FL 50 enters Sumter County.



At County Road 757 the route of FL 50 east meets it's original right of way which once continued west to Riverland Road in Hernando County.


Back in 2014 I spent time tracking down former alignments of what is now FL 50 on the north side of the Green Swamp in Hernando County and Sumter County.  As stated above the original right of way that likely was part of early FL 50 used was Riverland Road in Hernando County and County Road 757 in Sumter County to cross the Little Withlacoochee River.  The original right of way can be seen on the 1936 Hernando County and 1936 Sumter County Road Map from Part 1.

Heading westward from modern FL 50 towards the Little Withlacoochee reveals a narrow roadway with several abandoned homes.






County Road 757 ends at a gate just short of the Little Withlacoochee River and Hernando County Line.  The former community of Riverland and Richloam are to the west on Riverland Road on the Hernando County side.



Back tracking west to Hernando County briefly.  In Part 1 of the Florida State Road 50 series the original route right of way is shown on rhe 1936 Eastern Hernando County road map diverting from the modern highway at Clay Sink-Richloam Road.  From Clay Sink-Richloam Road the original highway entered the community of Richloam and turned eastward towards the Little Withlacoochee River to Riverland here on Riverland Road.  Below is the turn from Clay Sink-Richloam Road eastward on Riverland Road. 


Returning to modern FL 50 the highway next has a junction with CR 478A just east of County Road 757.


FL 50 east enters the community of Tarrytown where it has a junction with FL 471.  FL 471 is the primary north/south road through the Green Swamp.



Tarrytown was a lumber town that was along the Orange Belt Railway.  Although Tarrytown is still listed as an active community there isn't very much left that one would discern as "town like."  On the northeast corner FL 50 and FL 471 there is one older structure that was recently repainted.  The Orange Belt Railway used to cross through the sawmill located on the southwest side of FL 50 and FL 471.  The Orange Belt Railway operated during the late 1880s and early 1890s before being reorganized.  The Orange Belt Railway eventually was acquired by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad in 1902.


FL 50 east of FL 471 to the Van Fleet Trail is signed as a "Florida Scenic Highway."


East of FL 471 the route of FL 50 has Groveland listed 13 miles away while Orlando is shown as 42 miles away.


FL 50 east quickly enters the community of Linden.


The original right of way diverted from modern FL 50 in Linden at County Road 772B.  The original highway crossed over to the south side of Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, the path of County Road 772B still bears marks from a former crossing.  To the left of the photo below the Atlantic Coast Line was located between County Road 772B and modern FL 50.  The original highway continued east on County Road 772B where it rejoined modern FL 50 in Mabel near the Van Fleet Trail.


Linden as a community is very old and dates back to the 1840s.





The Scenic portion of FL 50 east ends in Mabel at the Van Fleet Trail.  Oddly FL 50 doesn't directly connect to the Van Fleet Trail which can only be accessed via County Road 772B.  The Van Fleet Trail is a 29.2 paved trail through the Green Swamp which was built on the grade of the Florida Western and Northern corridor line of the Seaboard Air Line Railroad.




East of Mabel the route of FL 50 intersects CR 469 which accesses Center Hill.



East of CR 469 the route of FL 50 enters Lake County.


Part 3 of the Florida State Road 50 series features the highway in Lake County.

Florida State Road 50 Part 3; Lake County


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Central Freeway of San Francisco (US Route 101)

The Central Freeway is a 1.2-mile elevated limited access corridor in the city of San Francisco.  As presently configured the Central Freeway connects from the end of the Bayshore Freeway to Market Street.  The Central Freeway carries the mainline of northbound US Route 101 from the Bayshore Freeway to Mission Street. The Central Freeway has origins with the establishment of Legislative Route Number 223 and is heavily tied to the history of the once proposed Panhandle Freeway.  The Central Freeway between the Bayshore Freeway and Mission Street was completed during 1955.  The corridor was extended to a one-way couplet located at Turk Street and Golden Gate Avenue in 1959 which served to connect US Route 101 to Van Ness Avenue.  The Central Freeway was damaged by the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and has since been truncated to Market Street.   The Central Freeway as pictured on the blog cover was featured in the May/June 1959 California Highways & Public Works.  The scan below is fro

The Bayshore Freeway (US Route 101)

The Bayshore Freeway is a 56.4-mile component of US Route 101 located in the San Francisco Bay Area.  The Bayshore Freeway connects the southern extent of San Jose to the Central Freeway in the city of San Francisco.  The corridor was originally developed as the Bayshore Highway between 1923 and 1937.  The Bayshore Highway would serve briefly as mainline US Route 101 before being reassigned as US Route 101 Bypass in 1938.  Conceptually the designs for the Bayshore Freeway originated in 1940 but construction would be delayed until 1947.  The Bayshore Freeway was completed by 1962 and became mainline US Route 101 during June 1963.   Part 1; the history of the Bayshore Freeway Prior the creation of the Bayshore Highway corridor the most commonly used highway between San Jose and San Francisco was El Camino Real (alternatively known as Peninsula Highway).  The  American El Camino Real  began as an early example of a signed as an Auto Trail starting in 1906.  The era of State Highway Mainte

Former US Route 101 and California State Route 41 through Paso Robles

Paso Robles is a city located on the Salinas River of San Luis Obispo County, California.  As originally configured the surface alignments of US Route 101 and California State Route 41 converged in downtown Paso Robles.  US Route 101 originally was aligned through Paso Robles via Spring Street.  California State Route 41 entered the City of Paso Robles via Union Road and 13th Street where it intersected US Route 101 at Spring Street.  US Route 101 and California State Route 41 departed Paso Robles southbound via a multiplex which split near Templeton.   Pictured above is the cover of the September/October 1957 California Highways & Public Works which features construction of the Paso Robles Bypass.  Pictured below is the 1935 Division of Highways Map of San Luis Obispo County which depicts US Route 101 and California State Route 41 intersecting in downtown Paso Robles.   Part 1; the history of US Route 101 and California State Route 41 in Paso Robles Paso Robles ("Pass of the