Skip to main content

Visit to Portland, Oregon

In July, I traveled out to Portland, Oregon for work.  Though I had a hectic schedule and did not have access to a vehicle, I did have sometime to walk around Downtown Portland.  Maggie was kind enough to lend me her Nikon CoolPix camera for the trip, and my entire photoset on Flickr is here.

DSCN2918

Being from Pittsburgh, I have a fond appreciation of bridges and different styles.  In North Carolina, we don't have many truss, cantalever, suspension bridges around to cross on a daily basis.  In Portland, it's different - from the century old Hawthorne Bridge:

DSCN2907


Or the bascule Morrison Bridge:

DSCN2917

Portland's bridges over the Willamette River are certainly a combination of age, style, and functionality.

Another impression leaving aspect of Portland is the amount of green - specifically green spaces.  This includes Tom McCall Waterfront Park.  The land occupying the park was once part of the Harbor Drive Freeway.  The once main North/South route through the city was removed in 1974, and the park opened in 1978.

The park is now home to numerous concerts and events, and even on on a busy weekday was full of people.  Bikes, sunbathers, office workers on their lunch breaks, kids, and more filled the lineal park along the west bank of the Willamette.

DSCN2934

DSCN2920

But within Downtown Portland there are a number of different parks including the Ira Keller Fountain.  Possibly the most popular of the urban fountains within Portland. 

DSCN2969

Near Portland City Hall are two plaza squares that both have unique histories.  First, Chapman Square, which is home to the Oregon Trail memorial statue, was actually designed and planned for use by women and children only.

DSCN2902

The adjacent park square, Lownsdale Square, was originally intended as a gathering place for men only.  The centerpiece of Lownsdale Square is the Soldiers' Monument which is in tribute to the Oregonians that were killed in the Spanish-American War.

DSCN2980

Now, members of both sexes can mingle and relax at either square.  My have times changed!

I came away very impressed with Portland and wishing I had more time to explore and experience the city.  I've yet to see the Pacific Ocean and I was only 60 or so miles away!  I immediately told Maggie that we need to add the Pacific Northwest and Portland to our must visit list!

Comments

John Spafford said…
Nice Pictures Adam. Thanks for confirming what those of us who live hear already know - that the Pacific Northwest is indeed a great place to live and work! You'll need to come to Seattle next time your out this way.

Popular posts from this blog

Dillon Road

Dillon Road is a 34.2-mile highway located in northern Coachella Valley of Riverside County, California.  Dillon Road begins at Avenue 48 on the outskirts of Indio and ends to the west at California State Route 62 near San Gorgonio Pass.  Dillon Road was developed the 1930s as a construction road for the Colorado River Aqueduct.  Dillon Road serves as a northern bypass to much of the development of Coachella Valley.  Dillon Road is known for it's frequent dips and spectacular views of San Gorgonio Pass.   Part 1; the history of Dillon Road Dillon Road was constructed as a haul road for the Colorado River Aqueduct through Coachella Valley.  The Colorado River Aqueduct spans 242 miles from Parker Dam on the Colorado River west to Lake Mathews near Corona.  Construction of the Colorado River Aqueduct began during January 1933 near Thousand Palms and was made functional on January 7, 1939.  West of Berdoo Canyon Road the alignment of Dillon Road is largely concurrent with the Colorado

Oldtown Toll Bridge - Maryland and West Virginia

  The Oldtown Toll Bridge linking Oldtown, Maryland over the Potomac River with neighboring Green Spring, West Virginia is only one of a few truly privately owned toll bridges located in the United States. It's a simple bridge by design, as the 318 foot long Oldtown Toll Bridge is a low water bridge. Low water bridges are designed to allow water to safely and efficiently flow over the bridge deck. Additionally, a dozen concrete pedestals have been secured in the Potomac River in order to support the bridge and wooden deck. The bridge was constructed in 1937 when a gentleman by the name of Mr. Carpenter obtained the proper permits to build the Bridge through an Act of Congress. This was a blessing for residents, especially on the West Virginia side of the Potomac River, as it saved motorists commuting to Cumberland an hour in travel time. Using Mr. Carpenter's blueprints, the Army Corp of Engineers and a number of local laborers constructed the bridge and it remained under the

Tehachapi-Willow Springs Road

Tehachapi-Willow Springs Road is an approximately 21-mile highway located in southeast Kern County.  Tehachapi-Willow Springs Road begins at Tehachapi Boulevard (former US Route 466) in Tehachapi and crosses the Tehachapi Mountains via the 4,820-foot-high Oak Creek Pass.  Tehachapi-Willow Springs Road enters Antelope Valley of the wider Mojave Desert and passes by the historic stage station of Willow Springs to a southern terminus at Rosamond Boulevard.  Tehachapi-Willow Springs Road has historic ties to the Havilah-Los Angeles Road and Stockton-Los Angeles Road due to the once reliable presence of water at Willow Springs. Part 1; the history of Tehachapi-Willow Springs Road Oak Creek Pass and Willow Springs were known to the local tribes of the Tehachapi Mountains for generations.  The first documented European crossing of Oak Creek Pass was during 1776 as part of an expedition by Francisco Garces.  Oak Creek Pass is as used again by John C. Fremont during an 1844-1845 expedition to e