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NCDOT Announces 'New Exit Numbers' in Greensboro

Another press release that may raise more questions than it answers from NCDOT was placed online this afternoon (8/20): https://apps.dot.state.nc.us/pio/releases/details.aspx?r=2877

"Motorists traveling on Interstates 40 and 73 in Guilford County can expect to see new signs and mile markers. Last summer, the N.C. Department of Transportation decided to reroute I-40 traffic from the Greensboro Western Urban Loop back to I-40 Business based on citizen comments.

The department has started replacing the following signs:

  • Changing the green I-40 Business signs back to the blue I-40 signs;
  • Re-signing the exits along I-40 as Exit 212 (I-40/73) to Exit 227 (I-40/85);
  • Re-signing the exits along I-73 as Exit 103 (I-73/40 interchange) to Exit 96 (I-73/U.S. 220 interchange); and
  • Rerouting U.S. 421 to run concurrently with I-73 and parts of I-85.

The I-85 exit signs will remain the same."


See the URL for the entire release and access to a correct(!) map of the new exit signs and designations for all the Greensboro interstates. The release also says "shield pavement markings will be installed along I-40 prior to the I-85/I-40 split on the west side of Greensboro to help motorists determine which lane to follow."

One problem, the I-85/40 split is EAST of Greensboro. Doh!


They say the hope to be completed in a few more weeks. Where have we heard that before?


Comment: 8 months after the signage replacement project that was supposed to be done at the end of the year, then April, then July, NCDOT releases this 'Final' release only to say the job's not done yet. Are they going to release another statement in September saying 'we are finally, finally done, please please you must believe us now."


'Motorists can expect to see new signs.' Are Greensboro drivers now suppose to look up and notice the new signs after most have been up since April? Are irate citizens going to call in saying why are you expecting us to see new signs when you put new ones up a few months ago?


And of course, there has to be one major blunder. If the people putting the news release together would look at the attached map, or an editor brought in to peruse the statement before putting it online they might have noticed that I-85 and I-40 meet east of Greensboro, not west. I'll plan to go out to Greensboro in mid-September and make sure the project truly is done. And that there are no I-85 shields at the I-40/I-73 interchange.


Comments

Anonymous said…
wow! apparently the guy didnt know where I-85/I-40 split is.. lol. However, I like the idea of that..I am also living in Greensboro and not all signs are complete. I still see some Business 40 and US 421 signs in greensboro.. especially from the Bus 85/I-40 split eastwards. I dont know what is taking them long..

I just wish they can widen the Death Valley and replace all bridges on that section.. oh well.

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