Skip to main content

California State Route 14 on the Antelope Valley Freeway

This past year I drove the entirety of California State Route 14 on the Antelope Valley Freeway south from the Kern County Line to I-5 at Newhall Pass.


The present CA 14 is a 117 mile north/south State Highway which begins at US 395 and ends at I-5 near Newhall Pass.  Present day CA 14 is tied to numerous historically important Californian highways dating back to the times of wagon routes up to the era of the US Route System.


A great deal of early history of what became modern day CA 14 was discussed in the "Legend of the Ridge Route" regarding the realignment of State Highways in Newhall Pass:

"Chapter 3; practicality leads to Ridge Route Alternate through Piru Gorge

US 99/LRN 4 from the south end of the Ridge Route at Castaic Junction through Newhall Pass originally had been routed on; (what is now) Magic Mountain Parkway, Railroad Avenue, Newhall Avenue, and San Fernando Road.  In 1931 a new routing of US 99/LRN 4 bypassing Newhall Pass, Saugus and Newhall to Castaic Junction was constructed through Weldon Canyon on what is now known as The Old Road.  The former alignment of US 99/LRN 4 from Castaic Junction through Saugus and Newhall was partially reused as part of CA 7/LRN 23 and later by US 6 when it was routed to Long Beach in 1937.  US 6/LRN 23 entered Saugus via Soledad Canyon Road on the south bank of the Santa Clara River to Bouquet Canyon Road.  From Bouquet Canyon Road US 6 turned south towards Railroad Avenue and downtown Newhall.  US 6/LRN 79 followed Railroad Avenue and Newhall Avenue to San Fernando Road to reach Newhall Pass.  Former LRN 4 in from Castaic Junction to US 6/LRN 23 in Saugus was assigned to LRN 79 in 1939 according to CAhighways.org.  In 1940 US 6/LRN 23 bypassed Saugus and Newhall on a more more direct route to Newhall Pass on the new Sierra Highway.   Although the legislative definition of LRN 79 wasn't extended to Sierra Highway and US 6/LRN 23 until 1957 it was maintained as a State Highway through Newhall nonetheless.  LRN 79 was reassigned as part of CA 126 in 1964 and remained in the State Highway system until 2001."

Understanding highways in a historical context through Newhall Pass is incredibly complex and lengthy.  Newhall Pass has been a major corridor of transportation since Spanish Las Californias.  Given the large historic scope, I would highly suggest reading the full Legend of the Ridge Route blog for proper historical context regarding Newhall Pass.

Legend of the Ridge Route; a history of crossing the mountains between the Los Angeles Basin and San Joaquin Valley

The current designation of CA 14 was created during the 1964 State Highway Renumbering.  CA 14 from US 395 south to Newhall Pass was carved out of what was US 6 on LRN 23.  The unbuilt portion of CA 14 south to CA 1 in Pacific Palisades was defined as LRN 290 in 1959.  The change from US 6/LRN 23/LRN 290 to CA 14 can be seen by comparing the 1963 State Highway Map to the 1964 Edition.

1963 State Highway Map 


1964 State Highway Map 


The 1964 State Highway Map above shows part of CA 14 shifted to the Antelope Valley Freeway east of Saugus.  By 1966 the Antelope Valley Freeway was extended east to the planned junction with CA 249 and CA 122.  The planned route of the Antelope Valley Freeway through Palmdale also appears on the 1966 State Highway Map.



The 1967 State Highway Map shows the Antelope Valley Freeway completed between Saugus and Palmdale.  A small stub of the Antelope Valley Freeway is shown completed east of I-5 in New Hall Pass to Newhall Avenue/CA 126


The alignment of CA 14 north of Lancaster to Rosamond is shown shifted to a new expressway alignment on the 1969 State Highway Map.


The 1970 State Highway Map shows the Antelope Valley Freeway completed between I-5 in Newhall Pass to Palmdale.


Sometime between 1970 and 1975 the Antelope Valley Freeway was completed north of Palmdale to Lancaster.


It should be noted that part of Sierra Highway between Placerita Canyon Road and Golden Canyon Road is still under State Maintenance as CA 14U.  Presently Caltrans is attempting to repair the CA 14U section of Sierra Highway to turn over to the City of Santa Clarita.

Also of note, I recently drove a portion of CA 14 on the Antelope Valley Freeway north from Palmdale to Avenue D north of Lancaster.  Said portion of the Antelope Valley Freeway is co-signed as CA 14/CA 138.

California State Route 138

My approach to CA 14 south towards the Antelope Valley Freeway was via CA 58 east in Mojave of Kern County.  CA 58 east intersects CA 14 south at Exit 167.  As the name of the community implies Mojave is indeed in the Mojave Desert.






CA 14 south of CA 58 is signed on the Aerospace Highway in Mojave.  At Post Mile 16.07 CA 14 south intersects the CA 58 Business Route in downtown Mojave which is the old alignment of US Route 466.  Interestingly CA 14 south in Mojave has at least one "Grand Army of the Republic" shield which really calls back to the fact that the highway was once US 6.









CA 14 south multiplexes CA 58 BL east through downtown Mojave.  CA 58 BL splits east away from CA 14 at Post Mile L16.093 in downtown Mojave at Mojave-Barstow Highway.






CA 14 south of CA 58 BL expands to an expressway and crosses over a large rail overpass.  CA 14 south from Mojave is signed as 97 miles from Los Angeles.





CA 14 south expands to a freeway at Exit 64 for Silver Queen Road.




CA 14 south at Exit 61 accesses Backus Road.






CA 14 south enters Rosamond and accesses Dawn Road at Exit 58.



At Exit 55 CA 14 south has a junction with Rosamond Boulevard which is signed as access to Rosamond, Willow Springs International Raceway and Edwards Air Force Base.




At Exit 52 approaching Avenue A CA 14 south enters Los Angeles County.



At Exit 49 CA 14 south meets CA 138 at Avenue D.




CA 14 south begins a multiplex with CA 138 east.  Signage of the Antelope Valley Freeway begins on CA 14 south of Exit 49.



CA 14 south/CA 138 east meet Avenue F at Exit 47.



At Exit 46 CA 14 south/CA 138 east enters Lancaster and has access to Avenue G.  Traffic is directed to follow Avenue G to Fox Airport.





At Exit 45 CA 14 south/CA 138 accesses Avenue H.


CA 14 south/CA 138 east access downtown Lancaster via Avenue I at Exit 44.  Avenue I westward is the former alignment of CA 138 and the most direct access to the California Poppy Reserve.





CA 14 south/CA 138 east meet Signed County Route N5 at Exit 43 for Avenue J.



At Exit 42 CA 14 south/CA 138 accesses Avenue K.




At Exit 41 CA 14 south/CA 138 east accesses Avenue L and enters Palmdale.





At Exit 39 CA 14 south/CA 138 east accesses Avenue N.



At Exit 37 CA 14 south/CA 138 accesses 10th Street West.





At Exit 35 CA 138 east splits away from CA 14 south via Palmdale Boulevard.  Signed County Route N2 can be accessed via Exit 35 on Elizabeth Lake Road.



Access to Lake Palmdale via Avenue S is signed from Exit 33.  CA 14 south of Palmdale crosses the California Aqueduct and is signed as a Safety Corridor.






At Exit 30 CA 14 south has a junction with CR N3 on National Forest Highway and Pearblossom Highway.  CR N3 essentially exists on part of the corridor of the planned CA 249 which would have continued south to CA 2 on the Angeles Crest Highway.  Pearblossom Highway exists partially on the corridor of the planned CA 122.   There is also access to former US 6 on Sierra Highway from Exit 30.  CA 14 south also begins to follow the Santa Clara River at Exit 30.




Santa Clarita is signed as 27 miles away on CA 14 south on the Antelope Valley Freeway past CR N3.


Exit 27 on CA 14 south provides access to Soledad Canyon Road and Sierra Highway.




Exit 26 on CA 14 south accesses Santiago Road.  Exit 24 accesses Sierra Highway, Crown Valley Road and Red Rover Mine Road.





CA 14 south Exit 19 accesses Escondido Canyon Road.






CA 14 south begins to descend downhill approaching Exit 15 Aqua Dulce Canyon Road.











CA 14 south descends below 2,000 feet above sea level and at accesses Soledad Canyon Road.








CA 14 south enters Santa Clarita and begins to descend towards Newhall Pass.



At Exit 9 CA 14 south accesses Sand Canyon Road.



CA 14 south crosses the Santa Clara River and meets Via Princessa at Exit 6.



CA 14 south at Exit 5 meets Golden Valley Road.



At Exit 3 CA 14 south has signed access to Placerita Canyon Road.



CA 14 south descends to Exit 2 at Newhall Avenue which was up until recently part of CA 126.





CA 14 south descends into Newhall Pass where it terminates at I-5.  There is signed access to Old US 99 from Exit 1A on what is now known as the "Old Road."












Comments

Russ said…
An additional short segment north of Mariposa from the high school back to hwy 140.

Popular posts from this blog

California State Route 198

Over the past four years one of the most common State Highways I've driven in California has been California State Route 198.  Fortunately CA 198 has one of the best driving segments in the entire California State Highway System and some deep history dating back to the 1909 First State Highway Bond Act.


CA 198 in present configuration is a 141 mile east/west State Highway from US Route 101 in San Lucas of Monterey County east to the Generals Highway or Sequoia National Park in Tulare County.


CA 198 was one of the original Signed State Highways which was announced in a 1934 Department of Public Works Guide on Page 32.  CA 198 was aligned entirely over Legislative Route 10.  Originally CA 198 was the highest number assigned to any Signed State Highway.


CA 198 has come up several times on Gribblenation mostly in regards to former alignments.  While the history of the entire route of CA 198 will be discussed here much of the photographic details on particular areas can be found o…

California State Route 225; the Zombie Highway of Santa Barbara and presently shortest in California

This past month I visited the Santa Barbara Area and drove the many short State Highways located there.  The shortest and the strangest is the 0.081 mile California State Route 225.


As noted above CA 225 is presently only 0.081 miles in length and is located completely on Castillo Street in Santa Barbara between Montecito Street and US 101/CA 1.  Fortunately the Caltrans Post Mile Tool illustrates that CA 225 still exists despite almost being relinquished to death.



At present moment CA 225 is the shortest State Highway in California.  By the definition of actual field mileage the following State Highways are the five shortest in California:

1.  CA 225 at 0.081 miles
2.  CA 275 at 0.14 miles
3.  CA 283 at 0.36 miles
4.  CA 77 at 0.40 miles 
5.  CA 153/CA 265 at 0.50 miles each

The origin of CA 225 was back in 1933 when Legislative Route 150 was added to the State Highway system as a loop of US 101/LRN 2 between Santa Barbara east to near Montecito according to CAhighways.org.  As orig…

California State Route 60/Former US Route 60/70 through the Moreno Valley Badlands west to Riverside

This past month I drove California State Route 60 through the Moreno Valley Badlands westward towards the City of Riverside.  CA 60 through the Moreno Valley Badlands was once part of the corridors of US Route 60 and US Route 70.


The present route of CA 60 is a 70 mile (76 counting multiplex) slice of former US 60 between downtown Los Angeles east to I-10 near Beaumont.  The vast majority of CA 60 aside from a small section in the Moreno Valley Badlands is presently a freeway grade.



For me CA 60 holds some personal history as it was the route I used most frequently accessing work sites in the Inland Empire circa 2011-2013.  Despite what many others probably would say I always really enjoyed the Moreno Valley Badlands portion of CA 60.  Considering I frequently worked on US 60 through Arizona and New Mexico the route holds even more appeal.  I even have a CA 60 shield hanging up in my garage.




Part 1; History of Roadways in the Moreno Valley Badlands

CA 60 between Beaumont and Riverside…