Skip to main content

US Route 395 south of Kramer Junction to Interstate I-15 (former California State Route 95)

Recently I drove the southern most section of US Route 395 from Kramer Junction to Interstate 15.  This particular section of US 395 is infamous for being a dangerous sub-standard desert highway and most interestingly part of California State Route 95.


US 395 was extended southward into California during an AASHTO meeting in June of 1934 according to CAhighways.org.  Interestingly the California Signed State Highways were created just before US 395 was extended.  That being the case the route of US 395 took over the alignment of various State Highways:

-  From the Oregon State Border to the Nevada State Border US 395 was routed over CA 7 on Legislative Route Numbers 73 and 29.
-  From the Nevada State Line near Topaz Lake US 395 was routed over CA 7 on LRN 95 and LRN 23 south to CA 95/LRN 145 near Inyokern.
-  From LRN 23 the path of US 395 assumed the entire route of CA 95 on LRN 145 south to US 66/LRN 31 near Cajon Summit.
-  From LRN 145 the alignment of US 395 was co-signed with US 66/LRN 31 into San Bernardino to LRN 43.
-  From US 66/LRN 31 the route of US 395 was signed over LRN 43 to US 60/LRN 19.
-  From LRN 43 the route of US 395 multiplexed on US 60/LRN 19 to CA 740/LRN 78.
-  From US 60/LRN 19 the route of US 395 followed CA 740/LRN 78 to Parris where route 740 (what a weird number) split away.  US 395 remained signed LRN 78 to CA 71/LRN 77.
-  From LRN 78 the route of US 395 assumed the route of CA 71/LRN 77 to US 80 in San Diego.

The only known State Highway Map to show the actual 1934 State Highways that were replaced by US Routes was a Department of Public Works Publication from said year.  The Department of Public Works guide contains a map on Page 21 showing the Signed State Highways and a guide describing where they were to be located on Page 20/32.

1934 Department of Public Works Guide

Since this blog primarily focuses on the section of US 395 that was part of CA 95/LRN 145 it should be noted that the later was adopted as a State Highways in 1933 according to CAhighways.org.

CAhighways.org on LRN 145

CAhighways.org on US 395

The first State Highway Map published showing US 395 clearly was the 1936-1937 edition.

1936-37 State Highway Map

US 395 was likely truncated to it's present terminus in Hesperia at present I-15 likely in 1970.  According to CAhighways.org the US 395 signage south of Hesperia may have been in place until 1973.

So with the history of US 395 above in mind, how much has the route changed since it was signed as CA 95 on LRN 145 from Kramer Junction south to US 66?  The answer is surprisingly very little as the 1935 California Division of Highways Map of San Bernardino County indicates that US 395 essentially is on the same alignment that CA 95 was.

1935 Division of Highways Map of San Bernardino County

My approach to US 395 south was from CA 58 east in Kramer Junction.  Interestingly San Bernardino is signed as the control city at the CA 58/US 395 junction.


US 395 south of Kramer Junction quickly drops to a two-lane no passing zone area that signed as a Safety Corridor.  US 395 south of Kramer Junction is known for heavy truck traffic and a high rate of accidents.



CA 18 is signed as 34 miles to the south and I-15 at 41 miles on US 395.


Traffic is advised to have headlights running during daylight hours.


A new passing zone is about to open south of Kramer Junction and is presently being constructed.










The new passing zone near Kramer Junction will be a welcome addition as the first existing zone is a surprisingly long way south of CA 58.





The first major road to meet US 395 south of Kramer Junction is about 21.5 miles away at Shadow Mountain Road.



The guide sign south of Shadow Mountain Road shows CA 18 15 miles away whereas I-15 is signed as 22 miles away.


US 395 south utilizes another passing zone and passes through a grove of Joshua Trees before entering the City of Adelanto.








US 395 briefly expands to four lanes in Adelanto before dropping back to two south of Barlett Avenue.



US 395 progresses through Adelanto southward and meets CA 18 at Palmdale Road.









US 395 enters Victorville south of CA 18 before entering Hesperia near the California Aqueduct.  US 395 south continues to I-15 where it terminates at the freeway near Cajon Pass.  US 395 unfortunately is not given proper end signage at I-15, a shame indeed for what overall is a very grand highway.















Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Horace Wilkinson Bridge (Baton Rouge, LA)

Standing tall across from downtown Baton Rouge, the Horace Wilkinson Bridge carries Interstate 10 across the lower Mississippi River between West Baton Rouge and East Baton Rouge Parishes. Unusually, the bridge is actually named for three separate people; three generations of Horace Wilkinsons who served in the Louisiana State Legislature over a combined period of 54 years. Constructed in the 1960s and opened to traffic in 1968, this is one of the largest steel bridges on the lower Mississippi. It’s also the tallest bridge across the Mississippi, with its roadway reaching 175 ft at the center span. Baton Rouge is the northernmost city on the river where deep-water, ocean-going vessels can operate. As a result, this bridge is the northernmost bridge on the river of truly gigantic proportions. Altogether, the bridge is nearly 2 ½ miles long and its massive truss superstructure is 4,550 ft long with a center main truss span of 1,235 ft. The Horace Wilkinson Bridge is one of the largest

Sunshine Bridge (Donaldsonville, LA)

Located about halfway between Baton Rouge and New Orleans in southern Louisiana, the Sunshine Bridge spans the lower Mississippi River near the city of Donaldsonville as part of the longer Louisiana Highway 70 corridor, which connects Interstate 10 and Airline Highway (US 61) with US 90 in Morgan City. In the years following World War II, the only bridges across the lower Mississippi River in Louisiana were located in the area of the state’s two largest cities – Baton Rouge and New Orleans. Postwar agricultural and industrial development along the river in this region led to the planning of a series of infrastructure projects in southern Louisiana that were aimed at spurring this development and modernization of the Delta region. One of these projects was known as the Acadian Thruway and was developed in the 1950s as a toll road intended to connect greater New Orleans with Lafayette and points west while providing a high-speed bypass of the Baton Rouge metro area. The Thruway, which

Natchez-Vidalia Bridge (Natchez, MS)

  Located about halfway between Baton Rouge and Vicksburg near the city of Natchez, the Natchez-Vidalia Bridge crosses the lower Mississippi River between southwest Mississippi and northeastern Louisiana at the city of Vidalia. This river crossing is a dual span, which creates an interesting visual effect that is atypical on the Mississippi River in general. Construction on the original bridge took place in the late 1930s in conjunction with a much larger parallel effort by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to strengthen the area’s flood protection and levee system along the Mississippi River. One of the more ambitious aspects of this plan was to relocate the city of Vidalia to a location of higher ground about one mile downriver from the original settlement. The redirection of the river through the Natchez Gorge (which necessitated the relocation of the town) and the reconstruction of the river’s levee system in the area were undertaken in the aftermath of the Great Flood of 1927, wh