Skip to main content

Pena Boulevard to Denver International Airport (and the hunt for the Lizard People)

This past April I had a long layover while in Denver.  Given that I had some down time I ventured out into Denver and took Pena Boulevard back to Denver International Airport.


Pena Boulevard is a 11.1 mile freeway connecting Interstate 70 to Denver International Airport ("DIA").  Pena Boulevard is unique freeway in that it is owned and maintained by the City of Denver and essentially only exists to service traffic to-from DIA.  Pena Boulevard opened alongside DIA in 1995.  DIA itself was a replacement for the earlier for Stapleton International Airport which was located much closer to downtown Denver.

My approach to Pena Boulevard was from I-70 west.  From I-70 west there is no direct access ramp to Pena Boulevard which requires traffic to briefly take Airport Boulevard to access it.








Despite mainly being a service freeway for DIA the route of Pena Boulevard does have several local exits.  The first exit is at Green Valley Ranch Boulevard.


The next exit on Pena Bouelvard is located at 56th Avenue.



North of 56th Avenue Pena Bouelvard traffic is advised that the terminal of DIA is 7 miles away.


Pena Boulevard is advised as where specific airlines can be located.





Pena Boulevard curves east towards DIA, there are numerous signed facilities off the exit at Tower Road.




The only numbered exit on Pena Boulevard is "Exit 6" for E470.



Traffic on Pena Boulevard east of E470 is greeted with a giant Denver International Airport.


Pena Boulevard next has an exit at 75th Avenue which is signed as access to the DIA rental car facilities.  Amusingly a connector road under Pena Boulevard is named "Gun Club Road" which I thought was an interesting choice for an airport.




Pena Boulevard passes by the former toll facility which was removed from service in 2000.


Additional access to the rental car facilities is signed from the Jackson Gap Road exit.  Some of the airline overhead signage begins before Jackson Gap Road.







Approaching "Blucifer" there are additional overhead airline signs.  The sculpture that is locally known as "Blucifer" is technically called the Blue Mustang.  Blucifer was installed on Pena Boulevard in 2008 after it accidentally fell on and killed it's creator in 2006.  Blucifer has bright red eye and a somewhat demonic looking appearance.  No doubt Blucifer has contributed to the conspiracy theories surrounding DIA.



Pena Boulevard swings north again on a final approach to DIA.  Advisory signs direct traffic either to the West or East side of the Terminal Building.







My flight was on the East side of the Terminal building.












The Terminal Building of DIA has a massive central hall that serves as something akin to a grand hall.  The facade of DIA has inspired several conspiracy theories about what the construction design is supposed to represent.  Some of the more popular theories include stuff about a "One-World Order," the Knights Templar, the Stone Masons and Satanic symbolism.  My personal favorite conspiracy theory is that DIA is somehow home to the Lizard People who somehow rule the world from the airport (someone obviously watched V: the Final Battle before coming up with that).

The roof the terminal building at DIA is supposed to represent the snowy peaks of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains.



Westbound flights out of DIA has a fantastic view of Pena Boulevard; note that Pikes Peak is in the background.


The view of downtown Denver with Pikes Peak in the background is pretty nice too.


Comments

Anonymous said…
Gun Club Road is named after the Aurora Gun Club which is still opening and operating south of DIA. And it's Scary Horse, get it right lol

Popular posts from this blog

Former California State Route 1 over Old Pedro Mountain Road

California State Route 1 in western San Mateo County traverses the Montara Mountain spur of the Santa Cruz Mountains.  In modern times California State Route 1 passes through Montara Mountain via the Tom Lantos Tunnels and the highway is traditionally associated with Devils Slide.  Although Devils Slide carries an infamous legacy due it being prone landslides it pales in comparison to the alignment California State Route 1 carried prior to November 1937 over Old Pedro Mountain Road.   Old Pedro Mountain Road opened to traffic in 1915 and is considered one of the first major asphalted highways in California.  Old Pedro Mountain Road clambers over a grade from Montara towards Pacifica via the 922 foot high Saddle Pass.  Pictured above an overlook of Old Pedro Mountain Road facing southward towards Montara as it appears today.  Pictured below it the same view during June 1937 when it was part of the original alignment of California State Route 1.  Today Old Pedro Mountain sits abandoned a

California State Route 232

This past month I drove the entirety of California State Route 232 in Ventura County. CA 232 is an approximately 4 miles State Highway aligned on Vineland Avenye which begins near Saticoy at CA 118 and traverses southwest to US Route 101 in Oxnard.  The alignment of CA 232 was first adopted into the State Highway System in 1933 as Legislative Route Number 154 according to CAhighways.org. CAhighways.org on LRN 154 As originally defined LRN 154 was aligned from LRN 9 (future CA 118) southwest to LRN 2/US 101 in El Rio.  This configuration of LRN 154 between CA 118/LRN 9 and US 101/LRN 2 can be seen on the 1935 California Division of Highways Map of Ventura County. 1935 Ventura County Highway Map According to CAhighways.org the route of LRN 154 was extended west from US 101/LRN 2 to US 101A/LRN 60 in 1951.  Unfortunately State Highway Maps do not show this extension due to it being extremely small. During the 1964 State Highway Renumbering LRN 154 was assigned CA 232.  Of n

Former US Route 101 and California State Route 1 in San Luis Obispo

Originally US Route 101 upon descending Cuesta Pass southbound entered the City of San Luis Obispo via Monterey Street.  From Monterey Street US Route 101 utilized Santa Rosa Street and Higuera Street southbound through downtown San Luis Obispo.  Upon departing downtown San Luis Obispo US Route 101 would have stayed on Higuera Street southward towards Pismo Beach and Arroyo Grande.  Notably; beginning in 1934 US Route 101 picked up California State Route 1 at the intersection of Monterey Street/Santa Rosa Street where the two would multiplex to Pismo Beach.  Pictured below is the 1 935 Division of Highways Map of San Luis Obispo County depicting the original alignments of US Route 101 and California State Route 1 in the City of San Luis Obispo.   Part 1; the history of US Route 1 and California State Route 1 in San Luis Obispo San Luis Obispo lies at the bottom of the Cuesta Pass (also known as the Cuesta Grade) which has made it favored corridor of travel for centuries.  Cuesta Pass