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Lincoln M. Alexander Parkway and Red Hill Valley Parkway

This past April I drove the entirety of Lincoln M. Alexander Parkway and Red Hill Valley Parkway in the City of Hamilton between King's Highway 403 east to Queen Elizabeth Way.


Lincoln M. Alexander Park ("LMAP") and Red Hill Valley Parkway ("RHVP") serve as a southern bypass of downtown Hamilton.  Both LMAP and RHVP are locally maintained by the City of Hamilton which is something of an oddity for freeways in general.  The route of LMAP is 12.5 Kilometers/7.8 Miles long whereas RHVP is 6 Kilometers/4 Miles long.  LMAP was planned in the early 1960s but was ultimately built in phases between 1991 to 1997.  RHVP dates back even further with plans to construct it dating back to 1956.  RHVP was opened in phases; first in 2007 and in 2017.

My approach to LMAP was from KH 403 east.



LMAP is signed at a very slow 90KMPH, the first exit eastbound is at Golf Links Road/Mohawk Road.  Exits on LMAP are not assigned numbers.


LMAP includes a couple unique shields which include direction of travel and are seen generally at the end of on-ramps.


There is copious amounts of speeding fine signage on LMAP eastbound.


The next exit on LMAP east is at Garth Street.


Following Garth Street the next Exit on LMAP east is Upper James Street. 


East of Upper James Street the next Exit on LMAP is located at Upper Wentworth Street.


The next Exit on LMAP eastbound is located at Upper Gage Avenue. 


Just prior to the Exit at Dartnall Road the LMAP ends and RHVP begins.  RHVP has unique shield signage much like LMAP. 




RHVP has an Exit with Upper Red Hill Valley Parkway (seriously wouldn't have been easier just to assign a route number as a single freeway?) Mud Street and the route begins to curve north. 



RHVP begins to snake downhill and the speed limit falls to 80KMPH at the Greenhill Exit. 




The next Exit on RHVP is at King Street. 


The next two Exits on RHVP are located at Queenston Road and Barton Street. 



RHVP terminates at Queen Elizabeth Way.  I turned east on Queen Elizabeth Way towards the New York State Line. 



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