Skip to main content

Details of the NC68/US 220 I-73 connector

NCDOT was gracious to send me their plans of the proposed NC 68/US 220 Connector that will one day carry Interstate 73. The blog's Bob Malme also attended tonight's public workshop and was able to get additional details on the project and will be included below.

First, the entire project is 13 miles in length and will consist of three segments. The connector, which will be built totally on a new alignment, is approximately 8.5 miles in length and will be built to Interstate standards and a 70 mph design speed. Previously, it was thought that the road would be built just short of Interstate grade and upgrades made over time, but that is no longer the case.

The Connector itself is broken down into two sections (A & B). Going west(South I-73) to east (North I-73), there will be interchanges at NC 68, NC 150 in Summerfield and US 220.

Under the original plan, Interstate 73 was to follow NC 68 South to Interstate 40. But those plans have changed, I-73 will briefly bump NC 68 before turning south and east to connect with Bryan Blvd. near Piedmont-Triad International Airport. From there, I-73 will follow Bryan Blvd. until joining the Greensboro Urban Loop/I-840.

The change to the routing of I-73 has drastically changed how I-73 intersects NC 68. The new plans have the NC 68/I-73 interchange that will include flyovers that will carry I-73 South traffic over NC 68 as it heads towards Bryan Blvd.

Bob, who was able to see much larger versions of the plans in person, explains, "[I-73] from Bryan Blvd. will meet NC 68 south of the Connector, but they probably won't run together more than half a mile northbound and less southbound where a flyover ramp will take I-73 over NC 68 in the vicinity of today's Sedgefield Road intersection and have it merge about a 1/4 mile further south. The part of NC 68 that will be I-73 and the Connector will be built to 70 MPH/Interstate standards with 2 lanes in each direction."

Figure 1. The I-73 Connector tie in with NC 68. I-73 North will run left to right. (Larger pdf file accessible here.)

Figure 2. The I-73 Connector east of NC 68. I-73 North will run left to right. (Larger pdf file accessible here.)

Figure 3. The I-73 Connector continues east towards US 220. I-73 North will run left to right. (Larger pdf file accessible here.)

The connector ends at a partial interchange with US 220 just south of the Haw River. Bob describes the partial interchange, "The interchange will feature a flyover for US 220 South which will go over the river and I-73 as it turns right onto the Connector, there will be no access from US 220 North to I-73 South, I-73 North will just meet 220 on its current path."

Figure 4. After a diamond interchange with NC 150, the connector ends with a partial interchange with US 220 as I-73 turns north. (Larger pdf file accessible here.)


From there, Section C of the project begins. Section C will build a four lane limited access highway northwards paralleling the current two lane US 220. The project length is 4.5 miles and is currently built to a 60 mph design speed. According to Bob's discussions with Section C project engineers this evening, "Since no federal money is [currently] involved, it will be built as initially as a 60 MPH speed limited access highway, with interchanges for NC 65 and US 158 (which already exists) and NC 68 at the northern end (could not tell if you could access 68 from north I-73). They hope to get federal funds once the Connector construction is underway in 2014 to upgrade the road to interstate status by the time the Connector is finished around 2017."

Construction on the connector is scheduled to begin in 2014 with completion by 2017.

For more details:
Residents can review N.C. 68 connector plan ---Greensboro News&Record
Interstate 73 Progress Page - Sections 2 & 3 ---Bob Malme

Comments

James Mast said…
"Figure 1. The I-73 Connector tie in with I-68. I-73 North will run left to right. (Larger pdf file accessible here.)"

I think you ment NC-68 instead of I-68. lol.
Adam said…
Thanks! Blogging so much that I-68 and NC 68 starts to run together!

Popular posts from this blog

Sunshine Bridge (Donaldsonville, LA)

Located about halfway between Baton Rouge and New Orleans in southern Louisiana, the Sunshine Bridge spans the lower Mississippi River near the city of Donaldsonville as part of the longer Louisiana Highway 70 corridor, which connects Interstate 10 and Airline Highway (US 61) with US 90 in Morgan City. In the years following World War II, the only bridges across the lower Mississippi River in Louisiana were located in the area of the state’s two largest cities – Baton Rouge and New Orleans. Postwar agricultural and industrial development along the river in this region led to the planning of a series of infrastructure projects in southern Louisiana that were aimed at spurring this development and modernization of the Delta region. One of these projects was known as the Acadian Thruway and was developed in the 1950s as a toll road intended to connect greater New Orleans with Lafayette and points west while providing a high-speed bypass of the Baton Rouge metro area. The Thruway, which

Horace Wilkinson Bridge (Baton Rouge, LA)

Standing tall across from downtown Baton Rouge, the Horace Wilkinson Bridge carries Interstate 10 across the lower Mississippi River between West Baton Rouge and East Baton Rouge Parishes. Unusually, the bridge is actually named for three separate people; three generations of Horace Wilkinsons who served in the Louisiana State Legislature over a combined period of 54 years. Constructed in the 1960s and opened to traffic in 1968, this is one of the largest steel bridges on the lower Mississippi. It’s also the tallest bridge across the Mississippi, with its roadway reaching 175 ft at the center span. Baton Rouge is the northernmost city on the river where deep-water, ocean-going vessels can operate. As a result, this bridge is the northernmost bridge on the river of truly gigantic proportions. Altogether, the bridge is nearly 2 ½ miles long and its massive truss superstructure is 4,550 ft long with a center main truss span of 1,235 ft. The Horace Wilkinson Bridge is one of the largest

Natchez-Vidalia Bridge (Natchez, MS)

  Located about halfway between Baton Rouge and Vicksburg near the city of Natchez, the Natchez-Vidalia Bridge crosses the lower Mississippi River between southwest Mississippi and northeastern Louisiana at the city of Vidalia. This river crossing is a dual span, which creates an interesting visual effect that is atypical on the Mississippi River in general. Construction on the original bridge took place in the late 1930s in conjunction with a much larger parallel effort by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to strengthen the area’s flood protection and levee system along the Mississippi River. One of the more ambitious aspects of this plan was to relocate the city of Vidalia to a location of higher ground about one mile downriver from the original settlement. The redirection of the river through the Natchez Gorge (which necessitated the relocation of the town) and the reconstruction of the river’s levee system in the area were undertaken in the aftermath of the Great Flood of 1927, wh