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New York Comptroller Questions DOT on Bridge Repairs

According to an audit from New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli, slightly more than a third of serious highway bridge defects were not handled by NYSDOT within an acceptable time frame. The audit finds that there are serious bridge defects on bridges throughout New York. Another report from the Comptroller's office had found that 93 bridges had a current safety rating that was as bad or worse than the Champlain Bridge, which was recently demolished after serious bridge defects were found on that bridge. A number of frequently used bridges, including the Tappan Zee Bridge and Peace Bridge, were not included in this audit, but are also in serious need of improvements and repairs.

Granted, New York State is also in a serious financial situation, but not paying attention to the infrastructure may have more dire circumstances.

DiNapoli hits DOT over bridge repairs: Albany Times Union

Comments

Steve A said…
Oh, hi, budget crunch. What, you say every state has the same problem? Couldn't be.

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