Skip to main content

Texas Vacation - San Antonio

The last full day in Texas was spent in San Antonio. Out first stop was Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery where Maggie's grandfather is buried. It's amazing how tranquil a location it is amidst all the base activity that surrounds it. Over 120,000 lay in eternal rest there. It is an extremely powerful site.

For the entire set from San Antonio (nearly 100 photos), go here.

From there it was into downtown San Antonio. We arrived just prior to 11, so we were unable to check in though we did leave our car at the hotel. Obviously, the first stop in San Antonio is always The Alamo. It is correct that the building itself isn't as massive as you'd think, but take the time to walk the grounds and taken in the exhibits and you'll really begin to understand how the siege and battle at The Alamo is the powerful symbol for all of Texas as it still is today.

The Alamo

To first time visitor's, the smaller skyline of San Antonio maybe come as a surprise. But when you take a closer look, the skyscrapers San Antonio does have are impressive and complete with character from years gone by.

IMG_1302

IMG_1320

IMG_1329

We walked a bit in and around town and started to get hungry, so we headed down to the Riverwalk and ate lunch at The County Line BBQ. I definitely recommend it. The sauce was excellent...plus you can't go wrong with eating along the Riverwalk.

Finally, we were able to check into our hotel - the Drury Plaza Inn. The hotel is located in the former Alamo National Bank Building. The 24 story Renaissance style building was built in 1913 - and the Drury maintains a lot of the charm of this historical building.

The lobby is impressive - and a lot of the old bank features are incorporated into the hotel. For example old teller windows are part of the reservation desk.

IMG_1297

IMG_1292

IMG_1295

Our room was on the 17th floor and was very nice. You certainly had the feeling in the hallway you were in an old office building - but that added to the charm. Insie, the accomidations were well kept and I couldn't complain about the views of the outside.

The best part of the hotel had to be the relaxing views of San Antonio from the outdoor rooftop pool on the 23rd floor. And on a 90 plus degree day, it certainly was welcomed!

IMG_1363

IMG_1366

Next up was a cruise of the Riverwalk - and for $8 it was worth it. The cruise lasts about 45 minutes and if it's your first time there, like it was for us, the cruise really shows you a lot of the Riverwalk and some of the history behind it.

IMG_1375

IMG_1377

Margaritas, anyone?

From there it was dinner. One of the amazing thing's about the Riverwalk - besides the atmosphere - is how all of the various restaurants really try to sell you on their place. Unfortunately, you may not always get what you expected - and where we went for Tex-Mex was an example of that. Sadly, the Rio Rio Cantina seemed like a great place for dinner - but the service and the food didn't meet the hype.

However, it didn't damper a wonderful time in San Antonio. A city that you can instantly fall in love with. We didn't see everything there is to see in one day - but it was just enough to make you want to go back. And that we will!

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Ghost Town Tuesday; Transylvania, Louisiana

Back in 2014 I found myself returning home to Florida from Hot Springs National Park.  While passing through East Carroll Parish in Louisiana on US Route 65 I noticed an abandoned school on the side of the highway in a community called Transylvania. Supposedly Transylvania was founded in the early 19th century and was named after the University of the same name in Kentucky.  Supposedly Transylvania has about 700 residents according to the 2000 Census but you wouldn't know it from the total lack of occupied structures.  The earliest map reference I can find showing Transylvania present in East Carroll Parish is from 1878. 1878 Louisiana State Map I really can't find too much substantive information regarding the Transylvania Elementary School but the construction is likely Pre-World War II.  Supposedly the Transylvania Elementary School was abandoned in the late 20th Century and was open to vandals until the property was purchased in 2014. Article Regarding the Transy

Kancamagus Highway (NH 112 through the White Mountains of New Hampshire)

The Kancamagus Highway is a portion of NH 112 spanning from Conway to Lincoln through the scenic White Mountains of New Hampshire. Locally known as the "Kanc", the 34.5-mile drive is a recognized National Scenic Byway, offering travelers an abundance of history and spectacular beauty in addition to being considered one of the best fall foliage viewing areas in the world. The road opened up one of the last unconquered wilderness areas in New Hampshire, a region that the 1850 state Gazetteer called "unfit for human habitation." The two lane highway links the valleys of the Merrimack, Pemigewasset and Saco rivers, crossing over Kancamagus Pass at 2,855 feet in elevation, winding through some of the most difficult and gorgeous terrain in the state. A number of scenic vistas are found along the way offering remarkable views of the surrounding White Mountains, Swift River, Lower Falls and Rocky Gorge. You will not find services through much of the drive, until you get to

I-93 Sign Replacement Project Update

Decided to beat the Memorial Day rush and traveled up I-93 north of Boston Wednesday afternoon to check out the progress of the two sign replacement projects. Based on webcam images, I new some signs had been replaced at the southern and northern end of the Somerville to Exit 38 segment. Turns out signage has been updated northbound for Exit 28 (MA 28/38), the first sign for Exit 31 (MA 16) (I guess taking advantage of MassDOT closing I-93 between Exits 20 and 28 for Big Dig Tunnel maintenance a couple nights a month) and for Exits 34 to 38. A photographic summary starts with the first re-signed exit: This is the second overhead assembly. The signs are mounted on the previously existing overhead supports that go back to the opening of the lower and upper deck portions of I-93 in the early 1970's. I don't know about using the left hand side simply for an auxiliary sign for the exit, but there isn't much room to place it elsewhere. The next interchange that  has had