Skip to main content

Byrd: “Corridor H is my transportation crusade.”

From his hospital bed, West Virginia Senator Robert C. Byrd continues to secure transportation funding for various West Virginia highway projects. The latest includes another $4.5 million for Corridor H - which will most likely go towards construction of the Bismark to Davis section.

Byrd continues to push for the completion of the controversial Corridor H - even going at odds with the Obama Administration who cut off Corridor H funding in his proposed budget. Byrd in announcing the additional $4.5 million stated that “Corridor H is my transportation crusade.”

In addition to the $4.5 million for Corridor H, Byrd was able to secure:

  • $2 million for the Coalfields Expressway -- This funding would be used for work associated with the Allen Creek to Slab Fork area. To date, Byrd has secured $149.35 million for this project.
  • $2 million for the King Coal Highway -- Funding will be used for construction of an interchange to WV 460 in Mercer County. Byrd has previously secured $124.65 million for this project.
Source: Byrd Continues to Deliver for Safer Transportation Network --The West Virginia State Journal

Comments

Anonymous said…
It is admirable that Senator Robert Byrd states that "Corridor H is my transportation crusade".
There are many "Orphan" roads in West Virginia that are in deplorable condition. These roads are in housing developements where single family homes are located, not just one or two homes, but 30 to 40. It would be wonderful if Senator Byrd would delegate some of the Corridor H funds to these "Orphan Roads" that would serve many families in addition to the many people that use these roads, such as the US Postal service, Fedex, UPS, Newspaper delivery and Waste Management trucks, to mention a few.

Popular posts from this blog

Legend of the Ridge Route; a history of crossing the mountains between the Los Angeles Basin and San Joaquin Valley from wagon trails to Interstates

Over the past two decades I've crossed the Interstate 5 corridor from Los Angeles north over the Sierra Pelona Mountains and Tehachapi Range to San Joaquin Valley what seems to be an immeasurable number of times.  While Interstate 5 from Castaic Junction to Grapevine via Tejon Pass today is known to most as "The Grapevine" it occupies a corridor which has been traversed by numerous historic highways.  The most notable of these highways is known as the "Ridge Route."  This article is dedicated to the Ridge Route and the various highways that preceded it.  This blog is part of the larger Gribblenation US Route 99 Page.  For more information pertaining to the other various segments of US Route 99 and it's three-digit child routes check out the link the below. Gribblenation US Route 99 Page Ridge Route corridor introdution The Ridge Route as originally envisioned was a segment of highway which was completed in 1915 between the northern Los Angeles city limit

Establishing the numbering conventions of California's chargeable Interstates

The Federal Highway Aid Act of 1956 brought the Interstate Highway System into existence which would largely be constructed by Federal Highway Administration fund matching.  The Interstate Highway System was deliberately numbered to run opposite the established conventions of the US Route System.  While the Interstate Highway numbering conventions are now well established there was a period during the late 1950s where they were still being finalized.  This blog examines the history of the establishing of the chargeable Interstate Highway route numbers in California.  The above blog cover depicts the Interstate Highway route numbers requested by the Division of Highways in the Los Angeles area during November 1957.  The establishment of the numbering conventions of California's chargeable Interstates The Interstate Highway System was not created in a vacuum by way of the passage of the 1956 Federal Highway Aid Act.  The beginning of the Interstate Highway System can be found in the

California State Route 210 (legacy of California State Route 30)

  California State Route 210 is a forty-mile-long limited access State Highway located in Los Angeles County and San Bernardino County.  California State Route 210 exists as a non-Interstate continuation of Interstate 210 and the Foothill Freeway between California State Route 57 in San Dimas east to Interstate 10 Redlands.  California State Route 210 was previously designated as California State Route 30 until the passage of 1998 Assembly Bill 2388, Chapter 221.  Since 2009 the entirety of what was California State Route 30 has been signed as California State Route 210 upon the completion of the Foothill Freeway extension.  Below westbound California State Route 210 can be seen crossing the Santa Ana River as the blog cover.  California State Route 30 can be seen for the last time on the 2005 Caltrans Map below.  Part 1; the evolution of California State Route 30 into California State Route 210 What was to become California State Route 30 (CA 30) entered the State Highway System duri