Skip to main content

EBay: Would you pay $2600.50 for this?

It's a beauty no doubt, a cutout Oregon Highway 58 shield complete with Button Copy or Cats-Eyes numerals. It's embossed and was on a recent auction on ebay. Ok so maybe $100 or $200 even $250. But it went for $2600.50!!!! Yes, Two thousand, six hundred dollars and fifty cents! You can re-read that now...............

Ok, I own a few signs, and sign collecting is a part of this hobby. But I've yet to pay over $65 for one, and even then I had buyer's remorse. But $2600.50! Heck, I'm saving to buy new living room furniture next year, and this sign alone is greater than I am planning on spending. Maybe putting a sign or two on ebay will help pay for it.

Yeah for some you could say it's an investment, but who is gonna pretty much pay even more than $2600.50 for it when the poor guy passes away or decides to sell.

That's just a little too much for me.

What do you think? Would you pay that much for a sign? And what do you think the fair market value is for the sign above?

Comments

Anonymous said…
While $2600 is a lot to pay for a sign, I feel it is better preserved in this order than rusting away in a scrap heap. Reminds me of a few discussions the crew over at the IRC #roadgeek chat (at irc.zuh.net for those who are interested in dropping by some evening) have talked about in the past, in terms of procuring old signs. While I would not pay more than about $50 for a sign, I have been told that one way of getting an old sign for your collection is from the local DOT after the local DOT does a sign replacement. Some offices may be willing to legally hand over the sign to you if you ask nice enough. When I lived in Buffalo a few years ago, the City of Tonawanda's DPW replaced a vintage I-290 New York shield (example at http://www.interstate-guide.com/ishields/images/i-290_ny_02.jpg ) with the monstrosity of http://www.gribblenation.net/nypics/regional/erie/northtowns/i290md2.jpg. I do regret not contacting Tonawanda about getting the old school sign, and it's quite possible that it made its way elsewhere after 3 years. Still, I can think of better uses of spending $2600, regardless of whether they are fun expenditures or the necessary bills.

Popular posts from this blog

Caliente-Bodfish Road

Caliente-Bodish Road is one of the finest driving roads in the southern Sierra Nevada range and has rich history. The approximately thirty-two-mile-long highway connects from Kern River Road in Bodfish south to Bena Road (former US Route 466) via Caliente siding. Caliente-Bodfish Road is a segment of Thomas Baker's stage road which facilitated overland travel to the claims of the Kern River Gold Rush. The Baker Stage Road was constructed during the 1860s-1870s and spanned from the outskirts of Caliente north to the Stockton-Los Angeles Road near Tailholt in Tulare County. The blog cover photo is from the nine-mile segment north of Caliente Creek Road which is known as the "Lion's Trail." Caliente-Bodish Road carries the internal designation of Kern County Road 483. Part 1; the history of Caliente-Bodfish Road Caliente-Bodish Road is a segment of what was Thomas Baker's stage road to Kern River Valley.  The Kern River Gold Rush began in 1853 and spurred devel

The Dummy Lights of New York

  A relic of the early days of motoring, dummy lights were traffic lights  that  were  placed  in the middle of a street intersection. In those early days, traffic shuffled through busy intersections with the help of a police officer who stood on top of a pedestal. As technology improved and electric traffic signals became commonplace, they were also  originally  positioned on a platform at the center of the intersection. Those traffic signals became known as  " dummy lights "  and were common until  traffic lights were moved  onto wires and poles that crossed above the intersection.  In New York State, only a handful of these dummy lights exist. The dummy lights  are found  in the Hudson Valley towns of Beacon and Croton-on-Hudson, plus there is an ongoing tug of war in Canajoharie in the Mohawk Valley, where their dummy light has been knocked down and replaced a few times. The dummy light in Canajoharie is currently out of commission, but popular demand has caused the dummy

Madera County Road 400 and the 1882-1886 Yosemite Stage Road

Madera County Road 400 is an approximately twenty-four-mile roadway following the course of the Fresno River in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.  Road 400 begins at California State Route 145 near Madera and terminates to the north at Road 415 near Coarsegold.  Traditionally Road 400 was known as "River Road" prior to Madera County dropping naming conventions on county highways.  Road 400 was part of the original Yosemite Stage Route by the Washburn Brothers which began in 1882.  The Yosemite Stage Route would be realigned to the west in 1886 along what is now Road 600 to a rail terminus in Raymond.  Parts of Road 400 were realigned in 1974 to make way for the Hensley Lake Reservoir.  Part 1; the history of Madera County Road 400 Road 400 is historically tied to the Wawona Road and Hotel.  The Wawona Hotel is located near the Mariposa Grove in the modern southern extent of Yosemite National Park.   The origins of the Wawona Road are tied to the Wawona Hotel but it does predate th