Skip to main content

EBay: Would you pay $2600.50 for this?

It's a beauty no doubt, a cutout Oregon Highway 58 shield complete with Button Copy or Cats-Eyes numerals. It's embossed and was on a recent auction on ebay. Ok so maybe $100 or $200 even $250. But it went for $2600.50!!!! Yes, Two thousand, six hundred dollars and fifty cents! You can re-read that now...............

Ok, I own a few signs, and sign collecting is a part of this hobby. But I've yet to pay over $65 for one, and even then I had buyer's remorse. But $2600.50! Heck, I'm saving to buy new living room furniture next year, and this sign alone is greater than I am planning on spending. Maybe putting a sign or two on ebay will help pay for it.

Yeah for some you could say it's an investment, but who is gonna pretty much pay even more than $2600.50 for it when the poor guy passes away or decides to sell.

That's just a little too much for me.

What do you think? Would you pay that much for a sign? And what do you think the fair market value is for the sign above?

Comments

Anonymous said…
While $2600 is a lot to pay for a sign, I feel it is better preserved in this order than rusting away in a scrap heap. Reminds me of a few discussions the crew over at the IRC #roadgeek chat (at irc.zuh.net for those who are interested in dropping by some evening) have talked about in the past, in terms of procuring old signs. While I would not pay more than about $50 for a sign, I have been told that one way of getting an old sign for your collection is from the local DOT after the local DOT does a sign replacement. Some offices may be willing to legally hand over the sign to you if you ask nice enough. When I lived in Buffalo a few years ago, the City of Tonawanda's DPW replaced a vintage I-290 New York shield (example at http://www.interstate-guide.com/ishields/images/i-290_ny_02.jpg ) with the monstrosity of http://www.gribblenation.net/nypics/regional/erie/northtowns/i290md2.jpg. I do regret not contacting Tonawanda about getting the old school sign, and it's quite possible that it made its way elsewhere after 3 years. Still, I can think of better uses of spending $2600, regardless of whether they are fun expenditures or the necessary bills.

Popular posts from this blog

Deer Isle Bridge in Maine

As graceful a bridge that I ever set my eyes upon, the Deer Isle Bridge (officially known as the Deer Isle-Sedgwick Bridge) surprisingly caught my eye as I was driving around coastal Maine one Saturday afternoon. About 35 miles south of Bangor, Maine , the Deer Isle Bridge connects the Blue Hill Peninsula of Downeast Maine with Little Deer Isle over the Eggemoggin Reach on ME 15 between the towns of Sedgwick and Deer Isle . It should be noted that Little Deer Isle is connected to Deer Isle by way of a boulder lined causeway, and there is a storied regatta that takes place on the Eggemoggin Reach each summer. But the Deer Isle Bridge holds many stories, not just for the vacationers who spend part of their summer on Deer Isle or in nearby Stonington , but for the residents throughout the years and the folks who have had a hand bringing this vital link to life.   The Deer Isle Bridge was designed by David Steinman and built by the Phoenix Bridge Company of Phoenixville,

Former US Route 99 through Athlone and the last Wheeler Ridge-Sacramento corridor expressway

Athlone was a siding of the Southern Pacific Railroad located in Merced County on the alignment of what was US Route 99 between the cities of Chowchilla and Merced.  The Athlone corridor of US Route 99 was one of the first in San Joaquin Valley to fully upgraded to four lane expressway standards.  The Athlone expressway corridor was inherited by California State Route 99 when US Route 99 was truncated to Ashland, Oregon during June 1965.  The four-lane expressway through Athlone was the last segment of what had been US Route 99 in the Wheeler Ridge-Sacramento corridor to be bypassed by a freeway.  The Athlone expressway corridor was bypassed by the modern California State Route 99 freeway in 2016.  Despite being put on a road diet and narrowed what was the Athlone expressway corridor still displays evidence of being part of US Route 99.   Above the blog cover photo displays the Athlone expressway corridor of US Route 99 south of Merced as depicted in the July 1939 California Highways &

California State Route 38

California State Route 38 is a fifty-nine-mile State Highway located entirety in San Bernardino County and a component of the Rim of the World Highway.  California State Route 38 begins at California State Route 18 at Bear Valley Dam of the San Bernardino Mountains and follows an easterly course on the north shore of Big Bear Lake.  California State Route 38 briefly multiplexes California State Route 18 near Baldwin Lake and branches east towards the 8,443-foot-high Onyx Summit.  From Onyx Summit the routing of California State Route 38 reverses course following a largely westward path through the San Bernardino Mountains towards a terminus at Interstate 10 in Redlands.   Pictured as the blog cover is California State Route 38 at Onyx Summit the day it opened to traffic on August 12th, 1961.   Part 1; the history of California State Route 38 California State Route 38 (CA 38) is generally considered to be the back way through the San Bernardino Mountains to Big Bear Lake of Bear Valley