Skip to main content

Saratoga Automobile Museum - Saratoga Springs, New York

 


Within the friendly confines of the Saratoga Spa State Park in Saratoga Springs, there is quite a bit to see and do. Among the Roosevelt Baths, the spas, the geysers, the walking trails and even the Saratoga Performing Arts Center, just to name a few places, there are a few museums to be found in well. One of those museums, located in the historic Saratoga Bottling Plant, is the Saratoga Automobile Museum. So one foggy day while I was in Saratoga Springs over the holidays to buy some locally famous Peppermint Pigs as Christmas gifts for family and friends, I decided to swing by the Saratoga Automobile Museum and see its collection of cars.

Once inside and after I had paid my admission, I was greeting by a very knowledgeable staff member who gave me a tour around the museum, giving me plenty of details about the museum and the main attraction of the museum itself, which is the collection of unique automobiles that make up the museum. After he explained the history and the car exhibits around the two floors of the museum to me, I was encouraged to explore the museum myself and take some pictures along the way. Since the museum has rotating exhibits, on the day I went, one floor had an exhibit of cars loaned by the staff members and volunteers that work at the museum, because after all, they love cars too and are happy to show them off. The second floor had an exhibit dedicated to the history of cars built in New York State in the days of yore, along with the history of race cars in the Empire State. Spending time in the museum was a great way to spend a little time. Let's see some of the nice cars that fill the museum, shall we...

1958 Chevrolet Impala convertible.
1925 Ford Model T popcorn truck, one of only two of its kind in existence. It was essentially the food truck of its day and spent its days in the food industry in the beautiful small town of Cambridge, New York, not far from the border with southern Vermont. The food truck tradition continues in Cambridge today with the wildly popular King Bakery Donut Cart.
The truck served popcorn and other types of snacks and light lunch fare.
A vintage Ford Model T, showing the weathering of time.
Looks like a fun ride, even in the back.

An early 1966 Volvo.

A Lotus!

A reminder that the museum was once a bottling plant.

A newer model Corvette.
A car from the 1930s made for the upper crust of society...

...since it included a small bar and liquor cabinet in the back seat. Try getting away with that today.

1910 Maxwell


More like a horseless carriage than a car. I can't remember which make or year this car was.

New York State has a rich history of auto racing, right from the early Vanderbilt Cup Races days and beyond.


Richard Petty's race car, which he used at Watkins Glen.


Dyson racing car.
Amphicar. Half boat, half car. Notice the propellers in the back.

Amphicar. Can go on roads and lakes.
The children's area of the museum, which includes a soap box derby car.
I also stumbled upon a small gallery in the museum that features paintings involving cars. Here's a few of them.



Back down to the first floor of cars.

The front of this car is patriotic.

I just really liked this photo.

One of a few remnants of the bottling plant era.
Now that the tour is done, here is a Saratoga Automobile Museum themed horse statue in front of the museum.I hope you enjoyed your tour of the museum as much as I have.



How to Get There:


Sources and Links:
Saratoga Automobile Museum - Saratoga Automobile Museum
Saratoga Automobile Museum - Discover Saratoga
Saratoga Automobile Museum - Saratoga Springs Heritage Area Visitors Center


Update Log:
January 25, 2020: Published original article to Unlocking New York.
August 25, 2021: Transferred article from Unlocking New York to Gribblenation.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Deer Isle Bridge in Maine

As graceful a bridge that I ever set my eyes upon, the Deer Isle Bridge (officially known as the Deer Isle-Sedgwick Bridge) surprisingly caught my eye as I was driving around coastal Maine one Saturday afternoon. About 35 miles south of Bangor, Maine , the Deer Isle Bridge connects the Blue Hill Peninsula of Downeast Maine with Little Deer Isle over the Eggemoggin Reach on ME 15 between the towns of Sedgwick and Deer Isle . It should be noted that Little Deer Isle is connected to Deer Isle by way of a boulder lined causeway, and there is a storied regatta that takes place on the Eggemoggin Reach each summer. But the Deer Isle Bridge holds many stories, not just for the vacationers who spend part of their summer on Deer Isle or in nearby Stonington , but for the residents throughout the years and the folks who have had a hand bringing this vital link to life.   The Deer Isle Bridge was designed by David Steinman and built by the Phoenix Bridge Company of Phoenixville,

Former US Route 99 through Athlone and the last Wheeler Ridge-Sacramento corridor expressway

Athlone was a siding of the Southern Pacific Railroad located in Merced County on the alignment of what was US Route 99 between the cities of Chowchilla and Merced.  The Athlone corridor of US Route 99 was one of the first in San Joaquin Valley to fully upgraded to four lane expressway standards.  The Athlone expressway corridor was inherited by California State Route 99 when US Route 99 was truncated to Ashland, Oregon during June 1965.  The four-lane expressway through Athlone was the last segment of what had been US Route 99 in the Wheeler Ridge-Sacramento corridor to be bypassed by a freeway.  The Athlone expressway corridor was bypassed by the modern California State Route 99 freeway in 2016.  Despite being put on a road diet and narrowed what was the Athlone expressway corridor still displays evidence of being part of US Route 99.   Above the blog cover photo displays the Athlone expressway corridor of US Route 99 south of Merced as depicted in the July 1939 California Highways &

California State Route 38

California State Route 38 is a fifty-nine-mile State Highway located entirety in San Bernardino County and a component of the Rim of the World Highway.  California State Route 38 begins at California State Route 18 at Bear Valley Dam of the San Bernardino Mountains and follows an easterly course on the north shore of Big Bear Lake.  California State Route 38 briefly multiplexes California State Route 18 near Baldwin Lake and branches east towards the 8,443-foot-high Onyx Summit.  From Onyx Summit the routing of California State Route 38 reverses course following a largely westward path through the San Bernardino Mountains towards a terminus at Interstate 10 in Redlands.   Pictured as the blog cover is California State Route 38 at Onyx Summit the day it opened to traffic on August 12th, 1961.   Part 1; the history of California State Route 38 California State Route 38 (CA 38) is generally considered to be the back way through the San Bernardino Mountains to Big Bear Lake of Bear Valley