Skip to main content

Former Florida State Road 758 on Siesta Key

As of September 2020 Florida State Road 758 west of US Route 41 on Siesta Key has been relinquished to Sarasota County.  I happened to be staying on Siesta Key during June of 2021 and thought it would be an opportune time to see if any signage changes to Florida State Road 758 had occurred (spoiler; there hasn't been any).  As an active highway Florida State Road 758 begins at US Route 41 in Sarasota and extends 5.432 miles east  to Interstate 75.  


Part 1; the history of Florida State Road 758 on Siesta Key

Prior to being truncated to US Route 41 the alignment of Florida State Route 758 ("FL 758") began at the western terminus of FL 72 on Siesta Key.  FL 758 followed Midnight Pass Road northward to High Avenue.  FL 758 followed High Avenue north to Siesta Drive in the fringe City Limits of Sarasota and began an eastward trek towards US Route 41.  FL 758 followed Siesta Drive over Bay Island and the Sarasota Bay Bridge to Osprey Avenue.  From Osprey Avenue FL 758 followed Bay Road to a junction with US Route 41.  

It is unclear when FL 758 on Siesta Key was incorporated into the State Road System.  FL 789 can be seen originating from the southern tip of Siesta Key at Midnight Pass and ending at US Route 41/FL 72 on the 1956 Shell Highway Map of Florida  It is likely the road network of Siesta Key was added to the State Road System due to the expensive swing bridge structures that existed there at the time.  USGS maps show a change in designation from FL 789 to FL 758 occurring at some point between 1992 and 2000. 

In 2018 Sarasota County accepted a $40,000,000 dollar road transfer offer with the Florida Department of Transportation.  This transfer offer included relinquishing all of FL 758 west of US Route 41 sans the Sarasota Bay Bridge to Sarasota County.  The transfer offer between Sarasota County and the Florida Department of Transportation was finalized during September of 2020.  Interestingly all FL 758 signage remains active in-field as of June 2021.  


Part 2; a drive on former Florida State Road 758 on Siesta Key

FL 758 began from the western terminus of FL 72 which has also been truncated to US Route 41 on Stickney Point Road.  West of US Route 41 Stickney Point Road is stilled signed as FL 72 onto Siesta Key.  Stickney Point Road crosses the Siesta Key Bridge and terminates at the Midnight Pass Road on Siesta Key.  The Siesta Key Bridge was constructed in 1968 as a replacement for an earlier bridge and features a dual bascule draw span design.  The Siesta Key Bridge is 567.6 feet in length and is still maintained by the Florida Department of Transportation.















Old Stickney Point Road can be found on Siesta Key.  As indicated on the 1956 Shell Highway Map of Florida this would have once been FL 782 before FL 72 realigned.  




Siesta Key has been previously called "Little Sarasota Key" and "Sarasota Key."  Siesta Key was largely plotted out and subdivided by the Siesta Land Company beginning in 1907.  Access to Siesta Key was connected by ferry until 1917 when the first bridge over Sarasota Bay was built.  This bridge was supplemented by the first Stickney Point Bridge being constructed in 1927.  Siesta Key largely is recognized as one of the more notable Gulf Coast resort communities in Florida. 


Former FL 758 follows Midnight Pass Road northward towards an intersection with Beach Road.  Beach Road is signed as the Siesta Key business district and was once part of County Route 789A.  The FL 758 signage directs traffic following the former State Road to stay on Midnight Pass Road.  










Former FL 758 continues north on Midnight Pass Road and turns right onto High Avenue. 













Former FL 758 continues north on High Avenue into the City Limits of Sarasota and swings eastward over the Hanson Bayou Bridge onto Siesta Drive on Bay Island.  The Hanson Bayou Bridge is a concrete tee beam design which opened in 1928.  








Former FL 758 follows Siesta Drive eastbound over the Sarasota Bay Bridge to Osprey Avenue.  The Sarasota Bay Bridge was constructed in 1972 as a replacement for a previous span in the same location which was built during 1926.  The Sarasota Bay Bridge is bascule design which is 1,278.3 feet in length.  Downtown Sarasota and the Ringling Causeway of FL 789 can be seen from the Sarasota Bay Bridge.  


























As noted in Part 1 FL 758 followed Osprey Avenue and Bay Road to US Route 41.  







Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Central Freeway of San Francisco (US Route 101)

The Central Freeway is a 1.2-mile elevated limited access corridor in the city of San Francisco.  As presently configured the Central Freeway connects from the end of the Bayshore Freeway to Market Street.  The Central Freeway carries the mainline of northbound US Route 101 from the Bayshore Freeway to Mission Street. The Central Freeway has origins with the establishment of Legislative Route Number 223 and is heavily tied to the history of the once proposed Panhandle Freeway.  The Central Freeway between the Bayshore Freeway and Mission Street was completed during 1955.  The corridor was extended to a one-way couplet located at Turk Street and Golden Gate Avenue in 1959 which served to connect US Route 101 to Van Ness Avenue.  The Central Freeway was damaged by the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and has since been truncated to Market Street.   The Central Freeway as pictured on the blog cover was featured in the May/June 1959 California Highways & Public Works.  The scan below is fro

The Bayshore Freeway (US Route 101)

The Bayshore Freeway is a 56.4-mile component of US Route 101 located in the San Francisco Bay Area.  The Bayshore Freeway connects the southern extent of San Jose to the Central Freeway in the city of San Francisco.  The corridor was originally developed as the Bayshore Highway between 1923 and 1937.  The Bayshore Highway would serve briefly as mainline US Route 101 before being reassigned as US Route 101 Bypass in 1938.  Conceptually the designs for the Bayshore Freeway originated in 1940 but construction would be delayed until 1947.  The Bayshore Freeway was completed by 1962 and became mainline US Route 101 during June 1963.   Part 1; the history of the Bayshore Freeway Prior the creation of the Bayshore Highway corridor the most commonly used highway between San Jose and San Francisco was El Camino Real (alternatively known as Peninsula Highway).  The  American El Camino Real  began as an early example of a signed as an Auto Trail starting in 1906.  The era of State Highway Mainte

The history of US Route 80 and Interstate 8 in California

The historic corridor of US Route 80 and Interstate 8 through the borderlands of southern California share a largely mutual history.  Both highways originated in the city of San Diego and departed the state at the Colorado River into Yuma, Arizona.  Both highways share numerous famous geographical components such as the Mountain Springs Grade and Algodones Sand Dunes.  This article serves as a comprehensive history of the combined US Route 80/Interstate 8 corridor in California from the tolled stage route era of the nineteenth century to the development of the modern freeway.   The blog cover photo features US Route 80 along the Mountains Springs Grade through In-Ko-Pah Gorge during late 1920s.  This photo is part of the Caltrans McCurry Collection. Part 1; the history of US Route 80 and Interstate 8 in California US Route 80 and Interstate 8 in California share a largely mutual history.  The backstory of both highways is tied heavily to the corridors of the Old Spanish Trail, Legisl