Skip to main content

Former Florida State Road 758 on Siesta Key

As of September 2020 Florida State Road 758 west of US Route 41 on Siesta Key has been relinquished to Sarasota County.  I happened to be staying on Siesta Key during June of 2021 and thought it would be an opportune time to see if any signage changes to Florida State Road 758 had occurred (spoiler; there hasn't been any).  As an active highway Florida State Road 758 begins at US Route 41 in Sarasota and extends 5.432 miles east  to Interstate 75.  


Part 1; the history of Florida State Road 758 on Siesta Key

Prior to being truncated to US Route 41 the alignment of Florida State Route 758 ("FL 758") began at the western terminus of FL 72 on Siesta Key.  FL 758 followed Midnight Pass Road northward to High Avenue.  FL 758 followed High Avenue north to Siesta Drive in the fringe City Limits of Sarasota and began an eastward trek towards US Route 41.  FL 758 followed Siesta Drive over Bay Island and the Sarasota Bay Bridge to Osprey Avenue.  From Osprey Avenue FL 758 followed Bay Road to a junction with US Route 41.  

It is unclear when FL 758 on Siesta Key was incorporated into the State Road System.  FL 789 can be seen originating from the southern tip of Siesta Key at Midnight Pass and ending at US Route 41/FL 72 on the 1956 Shell Highway Map of Florida  It is likely the road network of Siesta Key was added to the State Road System due to the expensive swing bridge structures that existed there at the time.  USGS maps show a change in designation from FL 789 to FL 758 occurring at some point between 1992 and 2000. 

In 2018 Sarasota County accepted a $40,000,000 dollar road transfer offer with the Florida Department of Transportation.  This transfer offer included relinquishing all of FL 758 west of US Route 41 sans the Sarasota Bay Bridge to Sarasota County.  The transfer offer between Sarasota County and the Florida Department of Transportation was finalized during September of 2020.  Interestingly all FL 758 signage remains active in-field as of June 2021.  


Part 2; a drive on former Florida State Road 758 on Siesta Key

FL 758 began from the western terminus of FL 72 which has also been truncated to US Route 41 on Stickney Point Road.  West of US Route 41 Stickney Point Road is stilled signed as FL 72 onto Siesta Key.  Stickney Point Road crosses the Siesta Key Bridge and terminates at the Midnight Pass Road on Siesta Key.  The Siesta Key Bridge was constructed in 1968 as a replacement for an earlier bridge and features a dual bascule draw span design.  The Siesta Key Bridge is 567.6 feet in length and is still maintained by the Florida Department of Transportation.















Old Stickney Point Road can be found on Siesta Key.  As indicated on the 1956 Shell Highway Map of Florida this would have once been FL 782 before FL 72 realigned.  




Siesta Key has been previously called "Little Sarasota Key" and "Sarasota Key."  Siesta Key was largely plotted out and subdivided by the Siesta Land Company beginning in 1907.  Access to Siesta Key was connected by ferry until 1917 when the first bridge over Sarasota Bay was built.  This bridge was supplemented by the first Stickney Point Bridge being constructed in 1927.  Siesta Key largely is recognized as one of the more notable Gulf Coast resort communities in Florida. 


Former FL 758 follows Midnight Pass Road northward towards an intersection with Beach Road.  Beach Road is signed as the Siesta Key business district and was once part of County Route 789A.  The FL 758 signage directs traffic following the former State Road to stay on Midnight Pass Road.  










Former FL 758 continues north on Midnight Pass Road and turns right onto High Avenue. 













Former FL 758 continues north on High Avenue into the City Limits of Sarasota and swings eastward over the Hanson Bayou Bridge onto Siesta Drive on Bay Island.  The Hanson Bayou Bridge is a concrete tee beam design which opened in 1928.  








Former FL 758 follows Siesta Drive eastbound over the Sarasota Bay Bridge to Osprey Avenue.  The Sarasota Bay Bridge was constructed in 1972 as a replacement for a previous span in the same location which was built during 1926.  The Sarasota Bay Bridge is bascule design which is 1,278.3 feet in length.  Downtown Sarasota and the Ringling Causeway of FL 789 can be seen from the Sarasota Bay Bridge.  


























As noted in Part 1 FL 758 followed Osprey Avenue and Bay Road to US Route 41.  







Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Smithtown Bull in Smithtown, New York

  Before I moved to Upstate New York as a young man, I grew up in the Long Island town of Smithtown during the 1980s and 1990s. The recognizable symbol of Smithtown is a bronze statue of a bull named Whisper, located at the junction of NY Route 25 and NY Route 25A near the bridge over the Nissequogue River. Why a bull, you may ask. The bull is a symbol of a legend related to the town's founding in 1665 by Richard "Bull" Smythe, with a modernized name of Richard Smith. It also so happens that there is a story behind the legend, one that involves ancient land right transfers and some modern day roads as well. So the story goes that Smythe made an agreement with a local Indian tribe where Smythe could keep whatever land he circled around in a day's time riding atop his trusty bull. Choosing the longest day of the year for his ride, he set out with his bull Whisper and went about riding around the borders of the Town of Smithtown. As legend has it, Smythe t

Niagara Falls

  Arguably the world's most famous waterfall, or rather a set of waterfalls, Niagara Falls may not need much of an introduction, as it is a very popular tourist attraction in both New York State and the Province of Ontario, a destination of plenty of honeymooning couples, vacationing families and college students out for a good time for a weekend. Niagara Falls is also the site of many daredevil activities over the years, such as tightrope walking and going over the falls in a barrel. It is always nice to have a bit of a refresher, of course. Niagara Falls is made up of two main waterfalls, American Falls (also known as Rainbow Falls), which is on the American side of the border and Horseshoe Falls (also known as Canadian Falls), where the border between the United States and Canada crosses. There is also a smaller waterfall on the New York side of the border, which is Bridal Veil Falls. The height of the waterfalls are impressive, with Horseshoe Falls measuring at

Erie Canal: Little Falls and Moss Island

  Little Falls, New York is a small city in the Mohawk Valley that has been shaped by the forces of water throughout its history. Nowhere in Little Falls is that more evident than at Moss Island. Representing the Industrial Age, this is home of Lock 17 the tallest lock along the Erie Canal, but there is also evidence of the Ice Age in the form of 40 foot deep glacial potholes from when there was an ancient waterfall that was even larger than Niagara Falls at this spot, once draining Glacial Lake Iroquois when other outlets (such as the St. Lawrence River) were blocked by retreating glaciers. While Little Falls does not have the amount of industry around the river and canal than it once had, checking out what Moss Island has to offer is a great way to see what the city has to offer. Visiting Moss Island allows you to experience the engineering marvel that is the Erie Canal plus the wonders of nature by taking a hike around the island and seeing the glacial potholes. A