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Cave Spring, Georgia


For centuries, natural springs have been an attraction throughout the United States for tourists, vacationers, and residents alike.  From a break from the hot summer or possible healing remedies, these springs and the communities that surround them have become an oasis from the often stressful and overwhelming city life.

Cave Spring, Georgia is another of those unique spring towns.  Founded in 1832, Cave Spring is home to a limestone cave and spring that produces 2 million gallons of fresh water daily.   

The former Hearn Academy building is located in Rolater Park.

The springs are located within Rolater Park - a widely known community park and attraction.  To visit inside the limestone cave is $2.  The 29-acre park includes numerous historic buildings, including the 1851 Cave Springs Baptist Church, the former Hearn Academy schoolhouse (owned by the church), and the Hearn Inn (a former Academy dorm, now an active Bed & Breakfast).

The Hearn Inn is a former dormitory turned into a Bed & Breakfast.

The springs were well known among the Cherokee - as a source of drinking water and a central site for tribal meetings.  Just outside of the spring sits the Vann Cherokee Cabin.  Built by Avery Vann - a Scottish settler that married a Cherokee woman - it is now part of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail.

The Vann Cherokee House is considered the second oldest existing two-story Native American home.

The home was part of a community called Beaver Dam, which saw 17 white families from Georgia and Alabama illegally occupying Cherokee homes in February 1830.  The Cherokee were able to evict the squatters - allowing them to leave, then burning down the homes. The next day a small battle broke out, with one Cherokee killed.  As a result, the tribe looked for more political solutions and no longer forcibly removed occupying white families from their homes.  

Downtown Cave Spring

The Vann Cherokee Cabin was for decades incorporated into the Webster-Green Hotel.  When the hotel was condemned and slated for demolition in 2009, the Cave Spring Historical Society led the effort to preserve the cabin.  The cabin was fully restored and opened to the public in 2016.

Linda Marie's Steakhouse is a popular dining spot in Cave Spring.

Downtown Cave Spring is home to several small-town businesses - a hardware store, general store, antique shops, and more.  Of course, there is a coffee and ice cream shop, plus a steakhouse.  Cave Springs hosts numerous festivals throughout the year - including the annual Georgia Mushroom Festival held at the end of September.

All photos were taken by post author - March 16, 2023

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