Skip to main content

Expecting I-73 Soon in Virginia? It's gonna be awhile.

Progress on Virginia's portion of Interstate 73 may have taken a few steps back this week - as two separate items may impact how long and where I-73 may ultimately be built.

First in Richmond, the US Fourth Circuit of Appeals has extended the window for Virginians for Appropriate Roads (VAR) by one month due January 25th. The original date was December 21st. VDOT and the FHWA will then have until March 1st to file their response.

From there, the appellate court could make a U.S. District Court ruling based on the legal briefs; or they can schedule a hearing. VAR is appealing a decision from earlier this year that VDOT did not adequately study improvements to the existing US 220 corridor from Roanoke to Martinsburg in their findings. District Court Judge James C. Turk ruled that VDOT did all that was necessarily required in their study.

Story: I-73 appeal ruling delayed ---Myrtle Beach Sun News

But what may have the most impact on the timing and even the eventual routing of Interstate 73 in South Central Virginia was the decision by the Commonwealth Transportation Board to further study an alternative routing of I-73 put forward by the Henry County Board of Supervisors.

After completing a preliminary study of the alternate route, VDOT requested that the CTB remove the Henry County alternative from further consideration.

By a unanimous vote, the CTB directed VDOT to work with the Federal Highway Administration to “conduct the necessary studies and take such steps as may be required by law to consider shifting the location of the alignment.”

There is no word on how long this study will take or how much it will cost. But it certainly throws a roadblock to the eventual construction of Interstate 73. Furthermore, after the study is completed, a decision will need to be made and that will take additional time. In addition, depending on where the route enters Henry County from the south, the study may impact the entire proposed route.

Finally, this may throw a lifeline to Virginians for Appropriate Roads. Because the CTB has authorized a further study of the Henry County Alternative, it does open the door for VDOT to be required to study an upgrade to existing US 220 as well.

It's going to be a long time until we see Interstate 73 in Virginia.

Story: CTB ok's study of alternate I-73 route ---Martinsville Bulletin

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Legend of the Ridge Route; a history of crossing the mountains between the Los Angeles Basin and San Joaquin Valley from wagon trails to Interstates

Over the past two decades I've crossed the Interstate 5 corridor from Los Angeles north over the Sierra Pelona Mountains and Tehachapi Range to San Joaquin Valley what seems to be an immeasurable number of times.  While Interstate 5 from Castaic Junction to Grapevine via Tejon Pass today is known to most as "The Grapevine" it occupies a corridor which has been traversed by numerous historic highways.  The most notable of these highways is known as the "Ridge Route."  This article is dedicated to the Ridge Route and the various highways that preceded it.  This blog is part of the larger Gribblenation US Route 99 Page.  For more information pertaining to the other various segments of US Route 99 and it's three-digit child routes check out the link the below. Gribblenation US Route 99 Page Ridge Route corridor introdution The Ridge Route as originally envisioned was a segment of highway which was completed in 1915 between the northern Los Angeles city limit

Establishing the numbering conventions of California's chargeable Interstates

The Federal Highway Aid Act of 1956 brought the Interstate Highway System into existence which would largely be constructed by Federal Highway Administration fund matching.  The Interstate Highway System was deliberately numbered to run opposite the established conventions of the US Route System.  While the Interstate Highway numbering conventions are now well established there was a period during the late 1950s where they were still being finalized.  This blog examines the history of the establishing of the chargeable Interstate Highway route numbers in California.  The above blog cover depicts the Interstate Highway route numbers requested by the Division of Highways in the Los Angeles area during November 1957.  The establishment of the numbering conventions of California's chargeable Interstates The Interstate Highway System was not created in a vacuum by way of the passage of the 1956 Federal Highway Aid Act.  The beginning of the Interstate Highway System can be found in the

California State Route 210 (legacy of California State Route 30)

  California State Route 210 is a forty-mile-long limited access State Highway located in Los Angeles County and San Bernardino County.  California State Route 210 exists as a non-Interstate continuation of Interstate 210 and the Foothill Freeway between California State Route 57 in San Dimas east to Interstate 10 Redlands.  California State Route 210 was previously designated as California State Route 30 until the passage of 1998 Assembly Bill 2388, Chapter 221.  Since 2009 the entirety of what was California State Route 30 has been signed as California State Route 210 upon the completion of the Foothill Freeway extension.  Below westbound California State Route 210 can be seen crossing the Santa Ana River as the blog cover.  California State Route 30 can be seen for the last time on the 2005 Caltrans Map below.  Part 1; the evolution of California State Route 30 into California State Route 210 What was to become California State Route 30 (CA 30) entered the State Highway System duri