Skip to main content

Weekend trip to Asheville

Last weekend, took a trip to Asheville to beat the heat.

For the 100 photo flickr set, go here.

On Saturday, we spent the day exploring town. There is a lot to see in Downtown Asheville. It is unique to most of the major North Carolina cities, in that most if not all of the older buildings have been preserved allowing for a character you don't find in a Charlotte or a Raleigh.

Basilica St. Lawrence:

Built in 1909, the Basilica is awe inspiring, and the rose garden was in full bloom.





Here are a few shots from Downtown Asheville:

Wall St. has an older European feel.

Facade at the top of the Public Service Building.

The S&W Building. Now home to a very nice restaurant.
Facade of the Grove Arcade. We ate dinner at Carmel's Restaurant and Bar here.

The second day was a bit more of exploring.

Route: US 19/23, NC 63, NC 209, US 25/70, (NC 213), I-26, I-240, I-40...etc home.

NC 63 north of Leicester is a very thrilling and twisty drive. It's also not that heavily travel. Prior to the rather twisty climb up and down the mountains. There was this view near the buncombe/Madison County Line.

There were some interesting looking NC shields at NC 63's North End at NC 209 in Trust.

This one has an odd font and the corners of the diamond aren't rounded.

So basically, this is what an NC shield would look if Michigan did it.

This patch of Tiger Swallow butterflies were located just off highway 209 in Trust.

At the Spring Creek Cafe, there's this wall painting of a map of the area. Very good detail!

After stopping at Hot Springs, I had to solve the mystery on whether or not NC 213 actually is signed in Walnut. It's been a mystery to most people who follow NC Highway's where NC 213 actually ends. The state map shows an off shoot into Walnut, and there are even signs near Marshall for NC 213. But around Walnut, NC 213 just disappears from US 25/70. Last year, I received an e-mail explaining why continues on US 25/70 and ends at Walnut. There were to be improvements to a number of secondary roads to allow NC 213 to connect to NC 209 in Spring Creek. That never happened. So the NC 213 extension ended in Walnut. So after exploring a number of off shoots from US 25/70 around the Barnard/Walnut area. I did find on Walnut Road (an old alignment of US 25/70) one East NC 213 shield.

This shield is located on Walnut Road. Which is signed off of US 25/70 as SR 1439 (There's no hint of NC 213 signed at all into Walnut on US 25/70 or NC 213 East joining the two routes either.) There wasn't any 'END' signs or begin shields....just this NC 213 shield on a less than one mile loop road off of US 25/70. But it does, prove that NC 213 is indeed signed in Walnut.

Before heading back to Raleigh, we stopped in Asheville one more time for lunch. I certainly would recommend Salsa's for a great Mexican/Caribbean cuisine mix.

Accomplishments:

Clinched: NC 63 and completed NC 213.
Added mileage to: US 19 and 23.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

New River Gorge National River Area To Become A National Park

Great news for those that enjoy National Parks, West Virginia's New River Gorge Region, or West Virginia tourism.  Included within the Fiscal Year 2021 Omnibus Appropriations Bill signed by President Trump last night (December 27th) is the New River Gorge Park and Preserve Designation Act.   The act will designate the existing New River National River and over 72,000 acres of land within it as a National Park and Preserve. The New River Gorge Bridge will continue to be the centerpiece of the new New River Gorge National Park and Preserve. (Adam Prince, 2007) The river and surrounding land, which was added to the National Park System in 1978, will be our 63rd National Park.   The designation preserves over 7,000 acres as a National Park.  This area will not allow any hunting.  The remaining 65,000 acres of the existing park will be designated as a preserve allowing hunting and fishing. The main attractions to the New River Gorge - whitewater rafting, camping, hiking, mountain bikin

Douglas Memorial Bridge; the ruins of US Route 101 and the Redwood Highway over the Klamath River

Near the village of Klamath in southern Del Norte County, California sits the ruins of Douglas Memorial Bridge which once carried US Route 101 and the Redwood Highway over the Klamath River.  The Douglas Memorial Bridge was a arch concrete span which once crossed the Klamath River.  The Douglas Memorial Bridge was noted for it's unique grizzly bear statues which still adorn the remains of the structure.  Completed in 1926 the Douglas Memorial Bridge was the original alignment of US Route 101 ("US 101") and stood until it was destroyed by the Christmas Floods of 1964.  The Douglas Memorial Bridge is named in honor of G.H. Douglas who was a Assemblyman of the First District of California.  Below the Douglas Memorial Bridge can be seen during it's prime (courtesy bridgehunter ).  Part 1; the history of the Douglas Memorial Bridge The history of what would become US 101/Redwood Highway begins with the approval of the 1909 First State Highway Bond Act .  The First Stat

The Great PA 48 Clearance Sale

It's not often that any department of transportation sells land it purchased.  They are usually in the business of acquiring land for right-of-way.  But in 1982, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation did exactly that.  Offering to buyers land it purchased just 15 years earlier for the never-built Route 48 Expressway. Background: The sale was a result of the 1970s cash crunch the PennDOT experienced.  Many projects were cut back, shelved, or eliminated.  The 'New 48', or the North-South Parkway, which was touted for nearly 20 years as a connection from the industrial Mon Valley to the Turnpike and Monroeville was one of the casualties. In the mid-late 1960s, movement to construct the new highway began with targeting a two-mile stretch of highway from the Route 48 intersection at Lincoln Way in White Oak to US 30 in North Versailles.  The plan was then to continue the highway northwards to Monroeville.  Extension south across the Youghiogheny River and to PA 51 would