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NY Store Visits Trip

Today, I took a drive to our outlying stores here in New York for meetings and some store visits. I am implementing quite a few stocking program changes (vinyl siding, coilated fasteners, drywall/decking screws) at our New York locations over the next two months. So with a meeting at Oneonta, I figured i owuld take the whole day and travel to some of our stores in rural New York.

The stores I visited in order: Richmondville, Walton, Sidney, and Oneonta.

Route: I-90, I-88, NY 10, NY 206, NY 8, local roads in Sidney, NY 7, NY 357, NY 28, I-88, local roads and NY 7 in Oneonta, I-88 and I-90 to home.

Accomplishments: New mileage on NY 10 from NY 23 south to NY 206 in Walton; NY 206 from NY 10 to NY 8; NY 8 from NY 206 to I-88, Completed NY 357 in one shot, NY 28 from NY 357 to NY23/I-88.

Notes: It snowed much of the trip with the heaviest between 10-11 or basically from NY 23 to Walton.

NY 10 is a very nice road. It's pretty much flat but there are a few nice towns including Delhi and Walton. There are also a pair of Covered Bridges and an old stone bridge (on Delaware County 18) that are just off the highway and would be worth investigating. I didn't have the chance to do much on that.

If you are looking for old truss bridges...just travel along NY 7 from Schenectady to Binghamton. I-88 obviously is a quicker and very scenic drive. But the slower paced NY 7 goes through many small towns southwest of Oneonta, and because of the paralleling Susquehanna River and railroad tracks...unique bridges can be found on NY 7 or many of the side roads nearby. I traveled NY 7 in May 2005 and was amazed at the ammount of old and unique bridges.

Two of these bridges I encountered today. Main St in Sidney (which was old NY 8), and at the southern terminus of NY 357. There are plenty more along the NY 7 corridor but those two I crossed today.

Not many older I-88 New York signs left on I-88 still one old one left in Oneonta. If you are looking for any relics...travel NY 7...or snoop around the exits. There are still two left (and mighty big sized) on NY 357 South, I did get a photo of them.

If you are headed West (southwest) on I-88 just after Exit 20 in Richmondville, there is an old concrete arch bridge for a side street that runs right into the Westbound lanes. Of course it is blocked off, but it is something you don't see. There is even a NY historical marker there. Just haven't been able to check it out. You are able to access it via NY 7 via a few turns off the beaten path.

I got a lot done on my store visits..only two photos of some older I-88 shields. Just didn't have the extra time i thought i would have to photograph, the store visits went longer, but there was so much to cover.

Til Next Time.

Comments

Congrats on cinching some more NY roads. Can't wait to see the photos. :)

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