Skip to main content

I-73 takes another big step forward in South Carolina

Yesterday, two major developments in I-73's eventual construction occurred in South Carolina.

First, SCDOT narrowed the studied alternatives to the highway. Basically it is down to two possibilities. One follows and uses most of US 501 from Marion to SC 22. The highway would use part of the US 301 Marion Bypass, jump on to a new alignment, return to US 301 north of Galivants Ferry around SC 41 and then the road leaves US 501 to bypass Galivants Ferry and Aynor. South of Anyor the road uses US 501 until SC 22 and then follows the Conway Bypass to its end.

The Second is a new path alignment that runs north of the US 501 Option. It runs closer to Mullins (bypassing the town to the south) and reaches SC 22 near the SC 319 interchange.

There are crossovers between the two main alternatives, so a hybrid of both options may be the final routing. What is also intersting is that both options cross I-95 north of SC 38, which is the current consensus for the north segment of the highway.

To see the corridors in detail go here:

The next big chunk of news is that the Toll consideration for the highway is pushing forward. The bills introduced have been fast tracked and will bypass going to committee. A vote could be early as NEXT WEEK.

Although the bills do not mention the amount of a toll or where the booths would be placed - that would be up to the DOT - there are some more details given. Tolls would be reduced for local residents perhaps by way of a pass system.

Thoughts:

First on the new alignmnet alternatives: As the picture gets clearer on where I-73 may go, some predictions can be made. The state knows that using the existing US 501 corridor with upgrades will be cheaper to build. So look for US 501 on all or parts of the route. The key is the influence of Mullins, which really wants the highway to be near it. Also, how close of an impact will Anyor want I-73 to have. I do think that the state will pick the northern alterntive to Mullins and use the crossover to US 501 near SC 41 and follow US 501 down to SC 22.

As for the tolls, nothing has been said about some concerns about wanting to create a SC turnpike Authority vs. just slapping tolls on the road through SCDOT. The political debate and the eventual vote will be the determining factor on that.

Comments

Thanks for keeping us all up-to-date on the I-73 saga.

Popular posts from this blog

The Central Freeway of San Francisco (US Route 101)

The Central Freeway is a 1.2-mile elevated limited access corridor in the city of San Francisco.  As presently configured the Central Freeway connects from the end of the Bayshore Freeway to Market Street.  The Central Freeway carries the mainline of northbound US Route 101 from the Bayshore Freeway to Mission Street. The Central Freeway has origins with the establishment of Legislative Route Number 223 and is heavily tied to the history of the once proposed Panhandle Freeway.  The Central Freeway between the Bayshore Freeway and Mission Street was completed during 1955.  The corridor was extended to a one-way couplet located at Turk Street and Golden Gate Avenue in 1959 which served to connect US Route 101 to Van Ness Avenue.  The Central Freeway was damaged by the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and has since been truncated to Market Street.   The Central Freeway as pictured on the blog cover was featured in the May/June 1959 California Highways & Public Works.  The scan below is fro

The Bayshore Freeway (US Route 101)

The Bayshore Freeway is a 56.4-mile component of US Route 101 located in the San Francisco Bay Area.  The Bayshore Freeway connects the southern extent of San Jose to the Central Freeway in the city of San Francisco.  The corridor was originally developed as the Bayshore Highway between 1923 and 1937.  The Bayshore Highway would serve briefly as mainline US Route 101 before being reassigned as US Route 101 Bypass in 1938.  Conceptually the designs for the Bayshore Freeway originated in 1940 but construction would be delayed until 1947.  The Bayshore Freeway was completed by 1962 and became mainline US Route 101 during June 1963.   Part 1; the history of the Bayshore Freeway Prior the creation of the Bayshore Highway corridor the most commonly used highway between San Jose and San Francisco was El Camino Real (alternatively known as Peninsula Highway).  The  American El Camino Real  began as an early example of a signed as an Auto Trail starting in 1906.  The era of State Highway Mainte

Former US Route 101 and California State Route 41 through Paso Robles

Paso Robles is a city located on the Salinas River of San Luis Obispo County, California.  As originally configured the surface alignments of US Route 101 and California State Route 41 converged in downtown Paso Robles.  US Route 101 originally was aligned through Paso Robles via Spring Street.  California State Route 41 entered the City of Paso Robles via Union Road and 13th Street where it intersected US Route 101 at Spring Street.  US Route 101 and California State Route 41 departed Paso Robles southbound via a multiplex which split near Templeton.   Pictured above is the cover of the September/October 1957 California Highways & Public Works which features construction of the Paso Robles Bypass.  Pictured below is the 1935 Division of Highways Map of San Luis Obispo County which depicts US Route 101 and California State Route 41 intersecting in downtown Paso Robles.   Part 1; the history of US Route 101 and California State Route 41 in Paso Robles Paso Robles ("Pass of the