Skip to main content

Kingston, NY's New Roundabout Intersection Gets High Marks from Travelers

 

In what turned out to be a $12 million investment from the New York State Department of Transportation and the City of Kingston, NY, the four-way intersection connecting Broadway, Albany Avenue, and Interstate 587 was transformed into a much more efficient transfer point for traffic traversing western Kingston in all directions. The original four-way intersection here dated to the 1950s and its traffic signals were notoriously inefficient. Additionally, safe passage for pedestrians and other non-motorized traffic was no guarantee as those movements were not safely accounted for in the original design.


Above: The new Albany Avenue/Broadway Roundabout project increases efficiency of traffic movements across west Kingston while also improving motorist & pedestrian safety at one of the city's busiest intersections.

Construction of this $12 million project began in early 2020 and persevered throughout the COVID-19 Pandemic. Substantial completion status was attained at the end of 2021, with physical completion status being reached in Spring 2022. The new-look intersection has already had a significant impact on  travelers of all methods and has been a much needed investment for what had previously been one of Kingston's most outdated traffic transfer points.

The following pictures were taken by the author of this post using a DJI quadcopter drone. Always use proper judgment and situational awareness when flying in areas such as this. Click on each photo to see a larger version.


The following pictures were taken by the author of this post and detail some of the new traffic patterns and signage now in place at the new intersection:






Comments

Stephen Taylor said…
In Texas they're called traffic circles, and they're making a comeback. Austin is beginning to use them all over the city, including at a troublesome intersection near our home. The intersection has a large amount of north/south traffic, a steady amount of east traffic and very little from the west. Nasty intersection, controlled only by four stop signs. The COA installed the new traffic circle, and the intersection is now a joy to navigate. The traffic backups from the north continue, but traffic continues to flow and the backups move very quickly. The circle is very small, but it works very, very well. A good use of taxpayer money. Austin is also placing small circles in neighborhoods around town. My wife, who moved to Texas from Chicago, had never seen one and had to be taught how to use them. )She also had to be taught about low-water crossings and flash floods, but that's another story.)

My hometown had a large one where one east/west highway forked to the southwest and the northwest. TxDot installed a circle there back in the '50. Kids growing up in that town learned to navigate "The Circle" as it was called, very early on. It worked very well for my hometown, but when traffic circles fell out of favor with TxDot, the circle was replaced by a very awkwardly designed intersection with traffic signals. The locals hate that intersection with the white-hot heat of a thousand burning suns and wish they had their old circle back. They were all over Southeast Texas, and even today, in places where the circles have been replaced, businesses will still advertise their location as being "on the circle".

Popular posts from this blog

Establishing the numbering conventions of California's chargeable Interstates

The Federal Highway Aid Act of 1956 brought the Interstate Highway System into existence which would largely be constructed by Federal Highway Administration fund matching.  The Interstate Highway System was deliberately numbered to run opposite the established conventions of the US Route System.  While the Interstate Highway numbering conventions are now well established there was a period during the late 1950s where they were still being finalized.  This blog examines the history of the establishing of the chargeable Interstate Highway route numbers in California.  The above blog cover depicts the Interstate Highway route numbers requested by the Division of Highways in the Los Angeles area during November 1957.  The establishment of the numbering conventions of California's chargeable Interstates The Interstate Highway System was not created in a vacuum by way of the passage of the 1956 Federal Highway Aid Act.  The beginning of the Interstate Highway System can be found in the

The western end of US Route 6 and Laws Depot on the Carson & Colorado Railway

Back in June of 2016 I visited the western terminus of US Route 6 at US Route 395 located in Bishop, California of Inyo County on my way to Laws Depot. US 6 is one of the longest US Routes at 3,205 miles between Bishop, CA east to Provincetown, MA.  Historically US 6 was the longest US Route ever when it ended in Long Beach at 3,652 miles.  US 6 is known as the Grand Army of the Republic Highway and is mostly known for traveling through some of the most rural corners of the Continental United States. The endpoint of US 6 expanded wildly westward during the early US Route era.  Below is a summary of endpoints for US 6 that are listed on USends.com: 1927-1931 -  Provincetown, MA west to Erie, PA 1932-1937 -  Provincetown, MA west to Greeley, CO 1937-1964 -  Provincetown, MA west to Long Beach, CA 1964-Present -  Provincetown, MA west to Bishop, CA US 6 was one of the routes heavily truncated during the 1964 California Highway Renumbering.  US 6 had a large mul

Legend of the Ridge Route; a history of crossing the mountains between the Los Angeles Basin and San Joaquin Valley from wagon trails to Interstates

Over the past two decades I've crossed the Interstate 5 corridor from Los Angeles north over the Sierra Pelona Mountains and Tehachapi Range to San Joaquin Valley what seems to be an immeasurable number of times.  While Interstate 5 from Castaic Junction to Grapevine via Tejon Pass today is known to most as "The Grapevine" it occupies a corridor which has been traversed by numerous historic highways.  The most notable of these highways is known as the "Ridge Route."  This article is dedicated to the Ridge Route and the various highways that preceded it.  This blog is part of the larger Gribblenation US Route 99 Page.  For more information pertaining to the other various segments of US Route 99 and it's three-digit child routes check out the link the below. Gribblenation US Route 99 Page Ridge Route corridor introdution The Ridge Route as originally envisioned was a segment of highway which was completed in 1915 between the northern Los Angeles city limit