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US 64 Bypass in Asheboro, NC Now Open

Prior to COVID, my family and I would go to the North Carolina Zoo pretty much every month or so.  One of the time-consuming parts of the drive was the traffic lights and traffic on Dixie Drive (US 64) in Asheboro, which would easily add a few extra minutes and near misses to our drive.

This would all change on December 18, 2020, when a new 14.4-mile freeway carrying US 64 and bypassing Dixie Drive to the south opened.  The Asheboro Bypass, decades in the making, and the 1.7-mile Zoo Connector will make traffic to the Zoo and also through and around Asheboro better.

On December 22nd, on an unrelated trip, I was able to travel the new bypass and take a number of photos.  All of the photos are going west on US 64.  For my entire flickr set, head here.

Approaching the eastern terminus of the Asheboro Bypass.  What is interesting is that the old route - now Business US 64 - continues straight while the bypass loops around and over the highway.  

The overpass in the background is what carries the new bypass over Business 64. 

The NC 42 interchange.

What most likely will be the most used interchange on the bypass.  The Zoo Connector leads directly to the entrance of the North Carolina Zoo which is one of the most popular tourist attractions within the state.

The next three photos are from the new bypass' interchange with Interstates 73/74 and US 220.




The interchange with NC 49 will also be heavily used as NC 49 and US 64 is a regularly used alternative between Raleigh and Charlotte.  The Asheboro Bypass will improve the travel time using this route by eliminating numerous traffic lights.

The western terminus of the Asheboro Bypass.  The highway reduces to two lanes just beyond the curve.  US 64 continues west towards I-85 and Lexington at this point.

Needless to say, this will be a great time saver for our trips to the Zoo or even to Raleigh.  The road is a nice easy drive; hopefully, we can get back to the Zoo soon!

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