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A scenic drive along NH 112

NH 112 crosses over the Wild Ammonoosuc River at Beaver Pond (October 2005)
In my opinion, New Hampshire State Route 112 from Swiftwater to North Woodstock is an overlooked New England scenic drive.  Although not as popular as the Kancamagus Highway that NH 112 follows as it continues east over the White Mountains, this western segment of NH 112 still has amazing scenic views especially in the fall.  I thoroughly enjoyed this drive in the autumns of 2003 and 05.

I picked up NH 112 at its western beginning at US 302 near Bath.  This is only a few miles from where US 302 enters New Hampshire from Vermont over the Connecticut River.  Immediately at the start of the route is an abandoned truss bridge that once carried US 302 and NH 10 over the Wild Ammonoosuc River.

The former US 302 bridge over the Wild Ammonoosuc River (Top: October 2005 / Bottom: October 2003)

Continuing east about two miles on NH 112 from US 302, the Swiftwater Covered Bridge sits just to the north at Porter Road.  Erected in 1849, the bridge is actually the fourth to cross the Wild Ammonoosuc here.  The first bridge was built in 1810 but would be destroyed via flood eight years later.  A new bridge was immediately built and lasted for about ten year until another flood destroyed it.   The third span would be built in 1829 only to be demolished and replaced by the current span in 1849.



Throughout NH 112's journey along the Wild Ammonoosuc, there are some amazing views.  Views that are breathtaking any time of year.  As the highway continues eastwards towards North Woodstock, peaks of the White Mountain Range - some of which tower over 4,000 feet - come into view





At the Beaver Brook Trailhead - where the Appalachian Trail crosses the highway, a scenic overlook at Beaver Pond provides an opportunity for some great views especially in the fall.




From this point, NH 112 heads into the Lost River Valley into North Woodstock before continuing east to begin its journey as the Kancamagus Highway towards Conway.

All photos taken by post author - October 2003 & October 2005.

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