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The Blue Ridge Parkway - Mile 303.9 - Yonahlossee Overlook


The Yonahlossee Overlook sits about 800 feet north of the iconic Linn Cove Viaduct.  The name of the overlook pays homage to the former Yonahlossee Road which was one of North Carolina's first tourist roads and also helped to begin to end the High Country's isolation from the rest of the state.  The 20 mile Yonahlossee Road which was built in 1890 would eventually evolve to today's US 221 which runs below the overlook.  

Yonahlossee is Cherokee for "trail of the bear", and black bear are very common around the area.

The overlook is a popular stop for those wanting an up close look at the iconic Linn Cove Viaduct.  From the overlook, there is a simple trail that runs inside the guard rail to the bridge.


Although the overlook doesn't provide access to the extremely popular overground shot of the viaduct - that can be accessed via the Linn Cove Visitor's Center on the other side of the viaduct - stopping here will still offer amazing views of this impressive structure and the surroundings.




All photos taken by post author - July 2019.

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