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Throwback Thursday; International UFO Museum and Research Center

While traveling through Roswell, New Mexico back in 2012 I stopped at the International UFO Museum and Research Center.  The museum is located on US Route 285 a couple blocks south of US 380 in an old movie theater from the 1930s.  The street light designs are suffice to say somewhat unique.






Really the UFO Museum is pretty absurd and as one might expect it is dedicated towards the 1947 Roswell Incident (interestingly the crash sight is very far northwest of Roswell being more than halfway to Corona).  The UFO Museum was apparently founded in 1991 as a non-profit.  There are various odd display pieces that are alien oriented and a couple news articles of interest.  There isn't much to capture the interest aside from maybe a 30 minute stop but it was probably worth it just to get a photo of the above marque and street lamp.









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