Skip to main content

Triangle Expressway Toll Rate - 13.5 cents per mile

According to a recent article in Toll Road News, the North Carolina Turnpike Authority has announced a 13.5 cents per mile toll rate on the yet to be built 19 mile Triangle Expressway.

The toll rates are listed for electronic cashless transponders (like EZ-Pass) which will be the primary source of collection on the proposed toll road.

There will be four mainline toll plazas on the highway charging various tolls. Beginning with a toll plaza near the current NC 540 interchange with Davis Drive (Exit 68) 50c, 60c, 75c, and 30c tolls will be charged at each successive toll plaza. In addition, tolls from 25 cents to 75 cents will be charged at various on and onramps. For a more detailed view of the proposed toll schedule see below:

Source: Toll Roads News

The toll rate again is for those with transponders. If you do not own a transponder, the tolls can be two or three times the 13.5 rate depending on how you are registered. Since the Triangle Expressway will be a automated toll road, there is no traditional human-operated toll booths on the highway, tolls will either be collected by transponders or by mailed billing via video registration. Motorists who have registered their vehicles and addresses for video registration could face a toll twice the amount of those with a transponder. Those traveling the highway that are not registered (out of state vehicles, rental cars, etc) may face a charge of three times the 13.5 cent per mile toll.

Currently, Turnpike Officials hope to have the highway open in 2010. However, there is still the problem of gap financing plaguing the final construction of the highway. Until the legislature approves funding from either the highway trust fund or general fund to cover the remaining cost of the highway, the Triangle Expressway will remain a dotted line.

Comments

Bob Malme said…
The gap funding may come soon, if the proposals of the governor's 21st
Century Transportation Committee are approved. They are proposing ending
the practice of transferring $172 million annually from the Highway Trust
Fund to the state's General Fund. About $75 million of which would go to
the Turnpike Authority. See:
http://www.wral.com/news/news_briefs/story/2789331/

Popular posts from this blog

The Bayshore Freeway (US Route 101)

The Bayshore Freeway is a 56.4-mile component of US Route 101 located in the San Francisco Bay Area.  The Bayshore Freeway connects the southern extent of San Jose to the Central Freeway in the city of San Francisco.  The corridor was originally developed as the Bayshore Highway between 1923 and 1937.  The Bayshore Highway would serve briefly as mainline US Route 101 before being reassigned as US Route 101 Bypass in 1938.  Conceptually the designs for the Bayshore Freeway originated in 1940 but construction would be delayed until 1947.  The Bayshore Freeway was completed by 1962 and became mainline US Route 101 during June 1963.   Part 1; the history of the Bayshore Freeway Prior the creation of the Bayshore Highway corridor the most commonly used highway between San Jose and San Francisco was El Camino Real (alternatively known as Peninsula Highway).  The  American El Camino Real  began as an early example of a signed as an Auto Trail starting in 1906.  The era of State Highway Mainte

The Central Freeway of San Francisco (US Route 101)

The Central Freeway is a 1.2-mile elevated limited access corridor in the city of San Francisco.  As presently configured the Central Freeway connects from the end of the Bayshore Freeway to Market Street.  The Central Freeway carries the mainline of northbound US Route 101 from the Bayshore Freeway to Mission Street. The Central Freeway has origins with the establishment of Legislative Route Number 223 and is heavily tied to the history of the once proposed Panhandle Freeway.  The Central Freeway between the Bayshore Freeway and Mission Street was completed during 1955.  The corridor was extended to a one-way couplet located at Turk Street and Golden Gate Avenue in 1959 which served to connect US Route 101 to Van Ness Avenue.  The Central Freeway was damaged by the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and has since been truncated to Market Street.   The Central Freeway as pictured on the blog cover was featured in the May/June 1959 California Highways & Public Works.  The scan below is fro

Former US Route 101 and California State Route 41 through Paso Robles

Paso Robles is a city located on the Salinas River of San Luis Obispo County, California.  As originally configured the surface alignments of US Route 101 and California State Route 41 converged in downtown Paso Robles.  US Route 101 originally was aligned through Paso Robles via Spring Street.  California State Route 41 entered the City of Paso Robles via Union Road and 13th Street where it intersected US Route 101 at Spring Street.  US Route 101 and California State Route 41 departed Paso Robles southbound via a multiplex which split near Templeton.   Pictured above is the cover of the September/October 1957 California Highways & Public Works which features construction of the Paso Robles Bypass.  Pictured below is the 1935 Division of Highways Map of San Luis Obispo County which depicts US Route 101 and California State Route 41 intersecting in downtown Paso Robles.   Part 1; the history of US Route 101 and California State Route 41 in Paso Robles Paso Robles ("Pass of the