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US 40 - The National Road

If there is a highway that can capture the early pioneer spirit of this nation, it is the National Road.  America's Original Interstate Highway, generations of Americans have followed parts of what now is US 40 on their sojourns to the west.  From early Indian paths, to a federally funded route to the west, to a toll horse and wagon route, and finally into the automobile era, the National Road has served not only as a method of travel; it has also become a source of history, commerce, recreation, and exploration. 

An old segment of US 40 and the National Road in West Alexandria, PA
This site explores the history, the lure, and the features of this route through Maryland, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio.  The essay is a compilation of photos, research, and information by myself and others interested in exploring and sharing the splendor of this highway.  I am honored to include their fine efforts on this site.  If you wish to contribute to this site or have comments or links I can add, please contact me at aprince27@gmail.com.

Maryland

Pennsylvania

West Virginia

Ohio 

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