Skip to main content

Tour of the now opened Phase II of the Triangle Expressway

VMS announcing hey the road just opened today...you'll be tolled tomorrow

The second phase of the Triangle Expressway from NC 55 near Apex southwards to US 64 opened on August 1st.  It was the only free day for the new highway as tolls on the new highway would go into effect the following day Thursday, August 2nd.  So we had an impromptu Triangle Road Meet and six of us met up at Trali in Brier Creek to check out the new road.  Not bad for 48 hour notice!

126

We had a small surprise when we got to I-40.  First Lady Michelle Obama was in town and we just caught her motorcade getting onto I-540 East headed back to RDU.   Here's the temporary roadblock at the ramp from 540 East to 40 East.

127

So now lets get back to touring Phase II of the Triangle Expressway.

Toll NC 540 begins in a half mile

Last Exit before toll and by the way Tolls begin tomorrow.

Some of the signs on the now truncated NC 540 (Free) approaching the NC 54 interchange.  This is the only free interchange south of I-40.  If you look closely enough at the bottom of the second photo, you will seen an 'END' sign for the free portion of NC 540.

135

The overhead toll gantries at the NC 540 and NC 147 tolled interchange.  They now work.

NC 540 Toll South approaching NC 55

Overhead for NC 55 with the decorative style all sign posts have along the Triangle Expressway.

139

And here we are on the newly opened road.  People are taking advantage of the only 'free' day on the new highway.

141

These pedestal sign gantries are getting more popular in North Carolina.

143

The next overhead toll gantry just prior to the Green Level West Road interchange on NC Toll 540 South.

150

It's a quick drive to the new south end of the highway at US 64 in Apex.

156

Looking Southbound at the current construction that will extend the highway to NC 55 in Holly Springs.  This next segment should be open in January 2013.

158

Close-up of the more decorative style for bridges and overpasses along the TriEx.

159

Overheads on US 64 East to go onto NC 540 North.  Surprisingly, there aren't any exit numbers based on US 64 mileage here.

162

Getting back on to the TriEx at US 64 - a on-ramp overhead toll gantry greets you.

167

Morrisville Parkway isn't ready for traffic just yet

Just north of the Green Level West Road interchange is a ghost bridge for Morrisville Parkway.  The NCTA built the bridge for whenever Morrisville Parkway will be extended.  There is no current date for filling in the nearly two mile gap of Morrisville Parkway between NC 55 and Green Level Church Road.  There also are plans to build an interchange with the TriEx at Morrisville Parkway in the future.  However, no grading for a future interchange was apparent.

Overheads approaching Exit 67

Now back on what was once Free NC 540 and now Toll NC 540 approaching the interchange with NC Toll 147. 

TOLL NC 540 ENDS - FREE NC 540 BEGINS

Finally, just prior to the NC 54 interchange this guide sign informs drivers of the end of the tolled section of NC 540 and the beginning of the free section of NC 540. 

Start of I-540 East - Exits 1B and 2

NC 540 doesn't last long for about a mile later is Interstate 40 and NC 540 becomes Interstate 540.  Lots of different '540's I know.  For my entire set on flickr, head here.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Sunshine Bridge (Donaldsonville, LA)

Located about halfway between Baton Rouge and New Orleans in southern Louisiana, the Sunshine Bridge spans the lower Mississippi River near the city of Donaldsonville as part of the longer Louisiana Highway 70 corridor, which connects Interstate 10 and Airline Highway (US 61) with US 90 in Morgan City. In the years following World War II, the only bridges across the lower Mississippi River in Louisiana were located in the area of the state’s two largest cities – Baton Rouge and New Orleans. Postwar agricultural and industrial development along the river in this region led to the planning of a series of infrastructure projects in southern Louisiana that were aimed at spurring this development and modernization of the Delta region. One of these projects was known as the Acadian Thruway and was developed in the 1950s as a toll road intended to connect greater New Orleans with Lafayette and points west while providing a high-speed bypass of the Baton Rouge metro area. The Thruway, which

Old River Lock & Control Structure (Lettsworth, LA)

  The Old River Control Structure (ORCS) and its connecting satellite facilities combine to form one of the most impressive flood control complexes in North America. Located along the west bank of the Mississippi River near the confluence with the Red River and Atchafalaya River nearby, this structure system was fundamentally made possible by the Flood Control Act of 1928 that was passed by the United States Congress in the aftermath of the Great Mississippi River Flood of 1927 however a second, less obvious motivation influenced the construction here. The Mississippi River’s channel has gradually elongated and meandered in the area over the centuries, creating new oxbows and sandbars that made navigation of the river challenging and time-consuming through the steamboat era of the 1800s. This treacherous area of the river known as “Turnbull’s Bend” was where the mouth of the Red River was located that the upriver end of the bend and the Atchafalaya River, then effectively an outflow

Huey P. Long Bridge (Baton Rouge, LA)

The decade of the 1930s brought unprecedented growth and development to Louisiana’s transportation infrastructure as the cities of New Orleans and Baton Rouge cemented their place as leading urban centers on the Gulf Coast. In the immediate aftermath of the success garnered by the construction of the massive bridge on the Mississippi River near New Orleans in 1935, planning and construction commenced on the state’s second bridge over the great river. This new bridge, located on the north side of Baton Rouge, was to be similar in design and form to its downriver predecessor. Completed in 1940 as the second bridge across the Mississippi River in Louisiana and the first to be built in the Baton Rouge area, this bridge is one of two bridges on the Mississippi named for Huey P. Long, a Louisiana politician who served as the 40th Governor of the State from 1928 to 1932, then as U.S. Senator from 1932 until his death by assassination at the state capitol in Baton Rouge on September 10, 1935