Skip to main content

Some MA Highway Observations and Photos

Took the annual holiday pilgrimage (sorry, wrong holiday?) to Massachusetts and while the weather was not too great for photo taking, I did take a few when leaving which will be scattered among my observations below.

1. The MA 3 Re-signing Project
This project is still not complete. MassHighway now lists its completion, which was to be during the Spring of 2008, as Spring 2009. There appears to be only 2 mainline BGSs that need to be replaced. Going north in Braintree the 1 mile Exit 20 I-93 sign (as featured on BostonRoads.com's Pilgrims Highway site) and the 1/2 mile sign going southbound for Exit 17, Union Street. They have put up new signs northbound 1 and 1/2 mile out for Exit 16, MA 18 in Weymouth. These did not replace old signs since, for as long as I can remember, there never was a 1 mile sign. The 1/2 mile sign was knocked down in the early 1980's and never replaced. The only warning of an upcoming exit since then has been a blue business sign. As you can see below, they have also not replaced all the signage on the ramps from Washington Street in Braintree...
The Mass. green sign to the right is new but the overheads to the left have not been replaced along the ramp until after the exit for Burgin Parkway and the Quincy Adams MBTA station.
After that though, the signs are new...
They still haven't posted trailblazer signs on the posts for US 1 or MA 3 as the MassHighway engineer I talked with said they would. The arrows change direction slightly for the next set of signs...
Not only are there no US 1 or MA 3 signs, they left the old North MA 128 sign on the left. (Maybe they plan to add a 'To' sign above?)

2. The I-93 Re-signing Project
This project was delayed from a letting in December to today (1/6/09). The contract states the project will replace all the signs from Exit 4 (MA 24) to Exit 20 (I-90). The Big Dig contractors have put up new signage after Exit 15 going NB and to the Andrew Square exit southbound. Are they planning to replace these, or is MassHighway just planning to reimburse the Turnpike Authority? Though the contract went out today, there already is a one new sign near the southern end of the project. They put up a new sign southbound for Exit 5B, MA 28 South...
Sorry for the poor quality, I noticed it at the last minute. Why the signs in this section need replacing is unknown, most are less than 15 years old, fairly new by MassHighway standards. (For contrast, the SE Expressway signs they are replacing as part of this project date to 1983/84). They plan to put up many VMS for this project which is supposedly not to be complete until sometime in 2010.

3. Progress on the "'128' Add-a-Lane" project.
Sorry I didn't get any photos here but part of this project to add an additional 4th lane from MA 24 to MA 9 is complete. It is the less than a mile section southbound between the University Ave/RR Station (Exit 13) interchange and the I-95 interchange (Exit 12, which is actually a 'left exit' for staying on '128' as it becomes I-93/US 1). They have put up new overhead signs for Exit 12, diagrammatic as per the latest MassHighway Standards that feature the yellow tab above the exit number tab indicating a left exit. They have dropped Braintree as a control city. Only capital cities need apply, as the signs show a straight arrow for I-93/US 1 North, Boston and a right curving arrow for I-95 South, Providence. They have also put up new 'End MA 128' and 'Begin I-93' ground mounted signs after the I-95 ramp. They are starting to excavate for what will be the fourth lane after the I-95 ramp to MA 138 on I-93/US 1 North.

I also took a couple trips into Boston. If anyone has any questions about signs I may have spotted, let me know.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Horace Wilkinson Bridge (Baton Rouge, LA)

Standing tall across from downtown Baton Rouge, the Horace Wilkinson Bridge carries Interstate 10 across the lower Mississippi River between West Baton Rouge and East Baton Rouge Parishes. Unusually, the bridge is actually named for three separate people; three generations of Horace Wilkinsons who served in the Louisiana State Legislature over a combined period of 54 years. Constructed in the 1960s and opened to traffic in 1968, this is one of the largest steel bridges on the lower Mississippi. It’s also the tallest bridge across the Mississippi, with its roadway reaching 175 ft at the center span. Baton Rouge is the northernmost city on the river where deep-water, ocean-going vessels can operate. As a result, this bridge is the northernmost bridge on the river of truly gigantic proportions. Altogether, the bridge is nearly 2 ½ miles long and its massive truss superstructure is 4,550 ft long with a center main truss span of 1,235 ft. The Horace Wilkinson Bridge is one of the largest

Sunshine Bridge (Donaldsonville, LA)

Located about halfway between Baton Rouge and New Orleans in southern Louisiana, the Sunshine Bridge spans the lower Mississippi River near the city of Donaldsonville as part of the longer Louisiana Highway 70 corridor, which connects Interstate 10 and Airline Highway (US 61) with US 90 in Morgan City. In the years following World War II, the only bridges across the lower Mississippi River in Louisiana were located in the area of the state’s two largest cities – Baton Rouge and New Orleans. Postwar agricultural and industrial development along the river in this region led to the planning of a series of infrastructure projects in southern Louisiana that were aimed at spurring this development and modernization of the Delta region. One of these projects was known as the Acadian Thruway and was developed in the 1950s as a toll road intended to connect greater New Orleans with Lafayette and points west while providing a high-speed bypass of the Baton Rouge metro area. The Thruway, which

Natchez-Vidalia Bridge (Natchez, MS)

  Located about halfway between Baton Rouge and Vicksburg near the city of Natchez, the Natchez-Vidalia Bridge crosses the lower Mississippi River between southwest Mississippi and northeastern Louisiana at the city of Vidalia. This river crossing is a dual span, which creates an interesting visual effect that is atypical on the Mississippi River in general. Construction on the original bridge took place in the late 1930s in conjunction with a much larger parallel effort by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to strengthen the area’s flood protection and levee system along the Mississippi River. One of the more ambitious aspects of this plan was to relocate the city of Vidalia to a location of higher ground about one mile downriver from the original settlement. The redirection of the river through the Natchez Gorge (which necessitated the relocation of the town) and the reconstruction of the river’s levee system in the area were undertaken in the aftermath of the Great Flood of 1927, wh