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NCDOT Approves I-74 'Widening'

On the same day NCDOT announced a major reorganization to make it more efficient and less prone to errors they also announced the winning bids for several construction contracts. These included the design-build contract for the remainder of the US 311 bypass (I-74), 7.9 miles from Spencer Road to US 220. Construction is to start September 2 and the project is to be completed by 2012. It will be built using GARVEE bond funds. The one problem though is that in all press releases for this project they refer to the project as a 'widening.'

See the press release HERE.

Comments: At least it appears they got the mileage for the project correct this time. They still insist the 10+ mile section now under construction is about 6 miles long. I guess it's two steps forward and one step back, so I guess that counts as progress.

Speaking of the existing I-74 project from Business 85 to Spencer Road that is due to be finished in 2011, it is almost twice ahead of schedule as projected (40% vs 21%). A source that lives nearer the construction site took a look at the I-85 interchange area yesterday and said many of the bridges are now paved along with one of the C/D ramps they're building along I-85 which was being used by construction equipment. I may be out that way next week, if so I'll try to post some photos.

Comments

Bob Malme said…
When I saw no change yesterday in the press releases indicating that the new I-74 contract was for widening, I decided to e-mail the communications office. I pointed out that this was an error and that the project press release should indicate the design-build contract was for constructing a new roadway.

I guess NCDOT's new mantra of responding more quickly to the public is true in this case. If you click the link above to the press release you will notice a smaller type 'Constructing' has replaced 'Widening' in the first sentence. If only they were as quick as this in correcting sign errors.

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