Skip to main content

Labor Day Weekend Trip - Northeastern NC (and just a bit into Virginia)

Joe Babyak, of NC Road Videos Fame, came up for a video and photo road trip Saturday. Since Joe hadn't spent time in the Northeastern part of the state - and I wanted to visit the two free small river ferries that I had not crossed. It was a good opportunity to roadtrip and visit some of the backroads of North Carolina.

Route: I-540 - US 64 - US 264 - NC 39 - US 64 - US 64A/Business - US 64 - US 64A/Business - US 13/17- Woodard Road - NC 308 - NC 45 - US 158 - Woodard Road - US 258 - US 258 Business (Franklin, VA) - US 258 - US 158 - US 301 - NC 46 - NC 48 - NC 581 - NC 58 - US 64 - I 540.

For the flickr set of the trip - Go here.

The first stop was at the old US 64 bridge over the Tar River. I have this bridge featured on Carolina Lost, but I figured to show Joe, and also revisit for the first time in nearly five years.



The former alignment of US 64 here - now called Quiet Waters Road - appears to still have some remnants of the white center lines used years ago.

Our next stop was the small town of Nashville. We ended up taking photos there for about 30-45 minutes and also spent time talking to some of the folks in town - who were very eager to tell some history about various buildings and goings on.



We skipped Rocky Mount on US 64 Business in order to see a few other areas. Just east of Rocky Mount on US 64A. Were two great candidates for Carolina Lost.


We then decided to take some photos of Robersonville.

There is really not much to town - although the former Bank of Robersonville building is unique. In the top photo it is the tall yellow brick building on the left. The building is three stories and taller than the rest in town and also is very narrow - almost looking out of place and ready to tumble down compared to the rest of town.

We also learned that there is a short 'Truck' NC 903 that bypasses the downtown.

After lunch, it was on to the first of the two river ferries. First, a great shot I like of the tiny crossroads of Woodard, NC.

The Sans Souci Ferry crosses the Cashie River. Like the Elwell Ferry over the Cape Fear, Sans Souci is a two car motorized cable ferry.



The next small town we stopped at was Colerain - which is on NC 45. It is also the Eastern Terminus of NC 42.




Parker's Ferry - which is the last of three river ferries in North Carolina - is located north of US 158 and Winton. Of the three ferry routes - this is one of the more remote routes as most of the road to and from the ferry is gravel. Parker's Ferry crosses the Meherrin River.


We briefly entered Virginia and hung around the city of Franklin. On Business US 258 there is a cutout for US 58 and of course we grabbed a shot of it.

Franklin was the largest of all the town's we stopped in along the way. Amazingly, it was the most quiet of all of them.


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

California State Route 232

This past month I drove the entirety of California State Route 232 in Ventura County. CA 232 is an approximately 4 miles State Highway aligned on Vineland Avenye which begins near Saticoy at CA 118 and traverses southwest to US Route 101 in Oxnard.  The alignment of CA 232 was first adopted into the State Highway System in 1933 as Legislative Route Number 154 according to CAhighways.org. CAhighways.org on LRN 154 As originally defined LRN 154 was aligned from LRN 9 (future CA 118) southwest to LRN 2/US 101 in El Rio.  This configuration of LRN 154 between CA 118/LRN 9 and US 101/LRN 2 can be seen on the 1935 California Division of Highways Map of Ventura County. 1935 Ventura County Highway Map According to CAhighways.org the route of LRN 154 was extended west from US 101/LRN 2 to US 101A/LRN 60 in 1951.  Unfortunately State Highway Maps do not show this extension due to it being extremely small. During the 1964 State Highway Renumbering LRN 154 was assigned CA 232.  Of n

Former US Route 101 and California State Route 1 in San Luis Obispo

Originally US Route 101 upon descending Cuesta Pass southbound entered the City of San Luis Obispo via Monterey Street.  From Monterey Street US Route 101 utilized Santa Rosa Street and Higuera Street southbound through downtown San Luis Obispo.  Upon departing downtown San Luis Obispo US Route 101 would have stayed on Higuera Street southward towards Pismo Beach and Arroyo Grande.  Notably; beginning in 1934 US Route 101 picked up California State Route 1 at the intersection of Monterey Street/Santa Rosa Street where the two would multiplex to Pismo Beach.  Pictured below is the 1 935 Division of Highways Map of San Luis Obispo County depicting the original alignments of US Route 101 and California State Route 1 in the City of San Luis Obispo.   Part 1; the history of US Route 1 and California State Route 1 in San Luis Obispo San Luis Obispo lies at the bottom of the Cuesta Pass (also known as the Cuesta Grade) which has made it favored corridor of travel for centuries.  Cuesta Pass

Former California State Route 1 over Old Pedro Mountain Road

California State Route 1 in western San Mateo County traverses the Montara Mountain spur of the Santa Cruz Mountains.  In modern times California State Route 1 passes through Montara Mountain via the Tom Lantos Tunnels and the highway is traditionally associated with Devils Slide.  Although Devils Slide carries an infamous legacy due it being prone landslides it pales in comparison to the alignment California State Route 1 carried prior to November 1937 over Old Pedro Mountain Road.   Old Pedro Mountain Road opened to traffic in 1915 and is considered one of the first major asphalted highways in California.  Old Pedro Mountain Road clambers over a grade from Montara towards Pacifica via the 922 foot high Saddle Pass.  Pictured above an overlook of Old Pedro Mountain Road facing southward towards Montara as it appears today.  Pictured below it the same view during June 1937 when it was part of the original alignment of California State Route 1.  Today Old Pedro Mountain sits abandoned a