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Winter Trip Into the Catskills

On Saturday, February 23, 2008, I took a roadtrip from the Capital Region of Albany, New York into the Catskill Mountains and the Hudson Valley of New York State with John Krakoff.  A recent snowstorm accented the scenery, draping the landscape with a fresh blanket of snow along the trip.  

Nicknamed the Winternationals, which for these purposes, a roadtrip made soon after a snowstorm, it was a fun day to take a roadtrip.

Routes traveled along the trip included (more or less in succession): NY 155, Albany CR 306, NY 85A, NY 85, Albany CR 1, Albany CR 401, Albany CR 403, Albany CR 409, Greene CR 50, NY 81, NY 145, NY 23, NY 296, NY 23A, NY 42, NY 28, NY 30, Delaware CR 1, NY 28, old NY 28, 
NY 212, Ulster CR 32, NY 32, Ulster CR 34, Greene CR 47, NY 23, NY 32, NY 143,  Albany CR 312, NY 443, NY 85, NY 85A, NY 155

Here are some photo highlights of the trip...



NY Route 81 westbound just before its western end at NY Route 145.  NY Route 81 goes through some of the smaller towns in northern Greene and southern Albany Counties.


Old stone arch bridge that once carried the old Susquehanna (Catskill) Turnpike.  This was found in East Durham and can be found off of NY Route 145 in East Durham.


Old warning sign found on an old alignment of NY Route 23 in Durham.  John Krakoff had found this a while back, and it is believed to be the only one if its kind still kicking around.  Please prove me wrong!


Pedestrian bridge over the Schoharie Creek in Hunter, on the way to the Hunter Mountain ski area.  Not sure if this once the entrance to the ski area, or if it is a nice decorative touch.  The vehicular entrance is on the left, lined with a median including foreign flags.


This is Hunter Mountain, one of the highest peaks in the Catskills.


A Ukrainian Catholic Church draped in snow.  This can be found near NY Route 23A near Lexington.


More winter mountain scenery along NY Route 23A near Lexington.


Typical mountain scenery view along the road.  This is on NY Route 42 southbound near Shandaken.


This is a covered bridge that connects to a New York State DEC recreation area.  It's a newer bridge, but still, very fitting for its surroundings.


Old sign goodness on Ulster CR 49A near Belleayre Mountain in Highmount.  The black on yellow sign for Fleischmanns is very rare indeed.  The only other example I have seen like that is near Ellicottville in Western New York's Cattaraugus County.


Mountain scenery on NY Route 28 northbound near Fleischmanns.


Downtown Margaretville, NY.


Cast iron sign and truss bridge on NY Route 30 southbound in Margaretville.  Trus bridges, and especially pont truss bridges, are a common sight in both the Catskills and Adirondacks of New York State.


Old stone school house near Margaretville.  This school was built back in 1820 and is a historic landmark.


This is on a New York City reservoir road near the Pepacton Reservoir, near the former hamlet of Arena.  New York City took a large number of acreage in the Catskills and Hudson Valley for reservoirs during the 1930s and 1940s, and as a result, a few towns / villages / hamlets fell victim to the rising waters.  New York City also maintains a number of through roads within the reservoir areas.


Tompkins Falls, as seen from the remote Barkaboom Road near the Pepacton Reservoir.


NY 28 southbound between Andes and Margaretville.


Old NY Route 28 in Fleischmanns is a gold mine for old signs.  There is also a third old cast iron sign from the 1930s (of a similar design) in downtown Fleischmanns.


Eastbound on NY Route 28 just east of Pine Hill.  NY Route 28 changes cardinal directions from an east/west route to a north/south route at the Ulster/Delaware County line.


NY Route 28 as it crosses the Espous Creek in Phoenicia.  The Esopus Creek is known for its tubing and kayaking opportunities.


NY Route 28 east of Phoenicia.


Nissen Road bridge over the Espous Creek near Boiceville.  When they say "do not cross", they mean it!


Pony truss bridge, constructed in 1924, on Ulster CR 40 near Mount Tremper.  Ulster CR 40 is part of an old alignment of NY Route 28.  

There was another truss bridge nearby, off of NY Route 212, that I wanted to get to, but the snow made it pretty much inaccessible.


Mountain scenery on Ulster CR 40.


Eastbound on NY Route 212 near Willow.


Entering downtown Woodstock (yes, that Woodstock, of hippie fame) on NY Route 212  eastbound.  Woodstock has a vibrant business district of shops and restaurants.


Eastbound on Ulster CR 32 (Glasco Turnpike) near Mt. Marion.


The abandoned Exit 20 interchange for Interstate 87 southbound (New York Thruway).  This can be found off of Ulster CR 34 (Malden Turnpike).


Truss bridge over the Cauterskill Creek near Catskill.  The Thruway Bridge is in the distance.

Comments

Adam said…
Best road trip of the year indeed!
Rob Adams said…
Great pictures. I've driven NY 28 many times on my way to and from Cooperstown, and through some of the other areas as well.

I'm aware of an old curve sign on a former alignment of NY 52 near Stormville, but it doesn't say "warning" on it. I haven't been through there in a year or so.

The pedestrian bridge over the Schoharie Creek in Hunter was the entrance up until about two years ago when the new bridge was put into service.

- Rob
Anonymous said…
Wonderful photos! You can help protect the rural character and undeveloped Catskill mountain views along Route 28 you captured so well in this diary.
Please go to
http://www.petitiononline.com/stm07/petition.html
and sign the petition to Gov Spitzer to protect the Catskill Park and forest preserve from precedent-setting real estate development.
Read more at
www.SavetheMountain.net
Julie McQuain, Hardenburgh
Barbie said…
Absolutely gorgeous,! what a beautiful job, I have linked you to my stone arch bridge in the Catskills of Sullivan county.

If at first you don't see it , look for historical sites in my labels

I'll surly come to see you more often now that I found you :)
mike said…
Uploaded another old sign.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/31409920@N00/2518992164/

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