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The newest piece of the Interstate 73 puzzle.

Today, I along with Bob Malme and Scott Kozel took a drive out to Greensboro and checked out the recently opened piece of the Greensboro Outer Loop. We also checked out the new Ellerbee section of I-73/74 and US 220. However, I didn't take any photos of that new highway on this route.

So here are some photos of the new bypass:

This is where I-85 South and now I-40 West move onto the Greensboro Outer Loop. Take a look at the difference in the I-40 and I-85 Business Loop shields. The 40 shield actually has the word 'Loop'.

Yes indeed, it's an I-73 shield on the overhead on the bypass at US 220. I-73 is signed on the newly opened southwestern corner of the loop. Can you hear the motorists just say...where did I-73 come from since no one has any clue on when I-73 South will appear with the US 220 South sign.

Here's where I-85 splits off to head to Charlotte. Even more of that phantom I-73 freeloading onto I-40.

Just because we are nice folks here at the blog. We'll take a time out from the I-73 lovefest to appreciate the contributions of a VMS and Wendover Ave.

The Exit 212A sign is not quite ready for the big leagues. One day (maybe 2013...maybe not) that sign is going to read I-840 North and yeah I-73 North will be on it too.

Now on I-40 East coming towards the loop from Winston-Salem. We find the South version of our friend I-73 (still freeloading off of I-40 though). Now what's up with the missing shield. In an amazing display of awareness, the DOT removed an incorrect standard Interstate 40 shield after realizing that there would be two I-40 Easts on the sign. The Business 40 shield hadn't been installed yet. Any takers on when that will get fixed?

Jealous since it wasn't included on the westbound shot at Wendover Avenue, I-73 makes an appearance here. What an attention whore.

I like these guide shields that North Carolina uses. Damn that 73 just wants to be seen in every shot doesn't it?

Well as I alluded to earlier, I-73 is a bit of a magician (or a freeloader). Just as quickly as it appears out of nowhere it disappears into thin air at I-85. We exited onto I-85 South at this point, but there are no references of this end of I-73 or that it would eventually continue south towards Asheboro with US 220.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Sorry I wasn't able to make it down today. Hope you guys had a most excellent time!
Chris Miller said…
I thought it odd that 220 and the "future 73/74" signs are all over 220 alt.

Also looks like a lot of signs on new Bus40 are still signed for 40, which would be confusing for anyone not from here.

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