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Just a Fall Drive

Took a small trip this afternoon around the area. Part of which was to get photos of Old NC 21 for Mike Roberson.

Route: NC 50, Old Creedmoor Road, NC 50, NC 56, NC 39, NC 42, US 264, US 117, US 264, I-540.

Accomplishments: New mileage on NC 42.

The leaves came out later than normal this year...and the past few days have been brilliant color. However, on Thursday we had a rain and windstorm come through and knocked down a good amount of the leaves. Still, there are plenty of great fall scenes out there. Like this one off of Old Creedmoor Road.

Just north of here and back on NC 50 is an old alignment of NC 21. This old alignment, still gravel, is decades old from when NC 50 was NC 21. The gravel road winds about a half mile or so before returning to pavement when it reaches Beaver Dam Road.

In Franklinton, NC 56 meets US 1-A. What's interesting is the design of the hyphen. The ends are slanted...and you can see it clearly in the photo below.

I am gonna go forward with the Carolina Crossroads Project...how can you not when you come across places like Raynour, NC.

Stopped for lunch in Bunn, NC. And I am glad I did, first Bunn has some older NC shields. But more interesting was the rural small town feel especially the Winstead Grocery & General Merchandise store.



South of Bunn at the tiny crossroad community of Emit (NC 39/231) was a great old crossroads gas station and corner store.

I headed out NC 42 East to Wilson to just see if any of Interstate 795 had been signed. It hasn't. But here are two decent sign shots from the road.


Nothing to eventful on the way home. Hopefully, I-795 will be signed by next Saturday when a few of us take an 'official' scouting road trip on the newly designated Interstate.

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