Skip to main content

Happy 4th and FL/GA/TN update review

Happy Independence Day to everyone! I hope everyone is taking some time off to enjoy our great nation's birthday. Myself, I have been taking the day off to catch up around the house, clean out the SUV, work on some pages, and have time to enjoy the rest of the day.

I announced updates to three states today. Florida, Georgia and Tennessee.

Florida:

I added over 35 photos from JP Natsiatka and one from myself to the gallery. JP, who had been hoping that gn.com would add Florida, sent in and continues to send in photos from throughout Florida. I added one photo of my own from the trip to St. Augustine in May 2004.

Speaking of St. Augustine...I added to the St. Augustine features. First, a new page on the Castillo de San Marcos. A impressive fort that has stood the test of time, and a few attacks, since the late 1600's. It's very cool to tour and explore, one thing I didn't realize was that there is a shuttle ferry to Fort Matanzas from the park grounds. I guess it proves that you can't always see everything!

Next are some random shots throughout St. Augustine that filled out a roll of film. They are from St. George Street and of a few statues. Finally, I did in fact have a photo of one of the marble lions that guard the Bridge of Lions. Well right now they are not. They have been moved to a safe place while the Bridge of Lions gets totally rehabbed.

Georgia & Tennessee:

Nine photos in Georgia and one in Tennessee added. Steve Williams sent in some neat finds in and around Athens, and Billy Riddle shares two photos from I-75.

A sneak preview:

West Virginia - Not much here, but ends from newly signed WV 193. And some Corridor H informational updates. I may start to piece together a Corridor L (US 19) page.

Pennsylvania: Is going to be busy. First at least 30 new keystones. Then more ENDS. The new PA 290 and a lot of other updated ends. Plus some odd signs here and there. Plus, I have been fortunate to gain permission to display the photography of Fred Yenerall, who took numerous sign photos -- mainly keystones -- throughout PA in the 60s, 70s, and 80s. There are at least 70 keystones so far I have access to among other signs. Mr. Yenerall also had taken numerous pictures of covered bridges, old barns (Mail Pouch included), and other old buildings throughout the state and Ohio. I will have a direct link set up to his other photos.

South Carolina - A lot of I-73 and Carolina Bays Parkway to talk about and even some photos.

North Carolina - Busy again. Roundabouts, an abandoned/seldom used weigh station, more ENDS, signs, new information on I-40's history and US 70, and a look at the original Independence Blvd. in Charlotte.

Virginia - Already more cutouts and signs have been sent in. Plus, I'll try to add another segment to the Lee Highway Page.

Florida/Georgia/Alabama - Already have new material in. It will be added after West Virginia.

Another roll of film will be developed...Only three rolls to go. What is in there I don't know.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Horseshoe Meadows Road; former California State Route 190 and the legacy of the Lone Pine-Porterville HIgh Sierra Road

This summer I had an opportunity to drive one of the lesser known great roads of California; Horseshoe Meadows Road from Whitney Portal Road westward into Horseshoe Meadows of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains.  Aside from being massive climb into the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains the path of Horseshoe Meadows Road was once part of California State Route 190 and was intended to be part of a Trans-Sierra Highway known as the Lone Pine-Porterville High Sierra Road.


Horseshoe Meadows Road is located west of Lone Pine of Inyo County and is 19.7 miles in length.  Horseshoe Meadows Road begins at an approximate elevation of 4,500 feet above sea level at Whitney Portal Road in the Alabama Hills and ends at an elevation of 10,072 feet above sea level in Horseshoe Meadows.  Horseshoe Meadows Road is the second highest paved road in California only behind Rock Creek Road near Tom's Place.  Pjammcycling rates Horseshoe Meadows Road with an average gradient of 6.2% and lists it as th…

History of the Big Oak Flat Road (Yosemite National Park)

This week I hiked much of what was the original alignment of the Big Oak Flat Road which is located to the north of the modern roadway.  Unlike the original alignment of the Wawona Road the Old Big Oak Flat Road is surprisingly intact.


The complete history of the Big Oak Flat Road including the original alignment can be found on a 2002 report from the U.S. Department of Interior on the Old Big Oak Flat Road.

U.S. Department of the Interior on the Old Big Oak Flat Road

The Big Oak Flat Road began construction east from the mining community of Big Oak Flat in towards Yosemite Valley in 1869.  The Big Oak Flat Road was constructed by the Chinese Camp and Yosemite Turnpike Company which had secured the franchise rights for a toll road to the Yosemite Grant (the designation prior to Yosemite National Park).  By the summer of 1871 the Big Oak Flat Road reached the northern cliffs above Yosemite Valley which is when the Chinese Camp and Yosemite Turnpike Company ran out of funding.  After the…

The Tioga Pass Road

Last Summer the Tioga Pass Road over the Sierra Nevada Mountains in Yosemite National Park opened late due to the heavy snow pack from the previous winter.  Approaching the start of July the Park Service finally had cleared the road to Tioga Pass.  That being the case I headed up shortly after the 4th of July holiday during a lull in the tourist season.


The Tioga Pass Road runs from the Big Oak Flat Road at Crane Flat east to US Route 395 ("US 395").  The Tioga Pass Road is largely within the boundary of Yosemite National Park but is maintained by Caltrans as California State Route 120 ("CA 120") east of the Tioga Pass entry station to US 395.  The National Park Service maintained portion of the Tioga Pass Road serve as a implied connection between the two segments of CA 120.  The Tioga Pass Road is the highway mountain pass in California reaching Tioga Pass at 9,945 feet above sea level.



Part 1; the history of the Tioga Pass Road

Tioga Pass first obtained notewort…