Skip to main content

Happy 4th and FL/GA/TN update review

Happy Independence Day to everyone! I hope everyone is taking some time off to enjoy our great nation's birthday. Myself, I have been taking the day off to catch up around the house, clean out the SUV, work on some pages, and have time to enjoy the rest of the day.

I announced updates to three states today. Florida, Georgia and Tennessee.

Florida:

I added over 35 photos from JP Natsiatka and one from myself to the gallery. JP, who had been hoping that gn.com would add Florida, sent in and continues to send in photos from throughout Florida. I added one photo of my own from the trip to St. Augustine in May 2004.

Speaking of St. Augustine...I added to the St. Augustine features. First, a new page on the Castillo de San Marcos. A impressive fort that has stood the test of time, and a few attacks, since the late 1600's. It's very cool to tour and explore, one thing I didn't realize was that there is a shuttle ferry to Fort Matanzas from the park grounds. I guess it proves that you can't always see everything!

Next are some random shots throughout St. Augustine that filled out a roll of film. They are from St. George Street and of a few statues. Finally, I did in fact have a photo of one of the marble lions that guard the Bridge of Lions. Well right now they are not. They have been moved to a safe place while the Bridge of Lions gets totally rehabbed.

Georgia & Tennessee:

Nine photos in Georgia and one in Tennessee added. Steve Williams sent in some neat finds in and around Athens, and Billy Riddle shares two photos from I-75.

A sneak preview:

West Virginia - Not much here, but ends from newly signed WV 193. And some Corridor H informational updates. I may start to piece together a Corridor L (US 19) page.

Pennsylvania: Is going to be busy. First at least 30 new keystones. Then more ENDS. The new PA 290 and a lot of other updated ends. Plus some odd signs here and there. Plus, I have been fortunate to gain permission to display the photography of Fred Yenerall, who took numerous sign photos -- mainly keystones -- throughout PA in the 60s, 70s, and 80s. There are at least 70 keystones so far I have access to among other signs. Mr. Yenerall also had taken numerous pictures of covered bridges, old barns (Mail Pouch included), and other old buildings throughout the state and Ohio. I will have a direct link set up to his other photos.

South Carolina - A lot of I-73 and Carolina Bays Parkway to talk about and even some photos.

North Carolina - Busy again. Roundabouts, an abandoned/seldom used weigh station, more ENDS, signs, new information on I-40's history and US 70, and a look at the original Independence Blvd. in Charlotte.

Virginia - Already more cutouts and signs have been sent in. Plus, I'll try to add another segment to the Lee Highway Page.

Florida/Georgia/Alabama - Already have new material in. It will be added after West Virginia.

Another roll of film will be developed...Only three rolls to go. What is in there I don't know.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Ghost Town Tuesday; Vineland, Florida; the town killed by Disney

Vineland is a small ghost town located in southwest Orange County, Florida near the junction of Florida State Road 535 and Interstate 4.  Vineland is somewhat unique due to it largely being squeezed out of existence by Lake Buena Vista which is the company town where Disney World is located. Vineland was founded in the late 1800s as Englewood.  The town name of Englewood changed to Orange Center in 1911 before finally assuming the name Vineland in 1924.  Much like the rest of Orange County the community of Vineland was centered around Citrus Grove.  In the case of Vineland said orange groves were centered around Ruby Lake. The end of Vineland came as the Disney Corporation began purchasing parcels of citrus grove land to build Lake Buena Vista.  Vineland fell into a sharp decline in the 1960s but the community managed to continue to exist to modern times.  Much of the street grid of Vineland still exists east of FL 535 but most of the original structures are either gone or falle

Old NY 10 and Goodman Mountain in the Adirondacks

  Old highway alignments come in all shapes and sizes, as well as taking some different forms after their lifespan of serving cars and trucks has ended. In the case of an old alignment of what was NY 10 south of Tupper Lake, New York, part of the old road was turned into part of a hiking trail to go up Goodman Mountain. At one time, the road passed by Goodman Mountain to the east, or Litchfield Mountain as it was known at the time. As the years passed, sometime around 1960, the part of NY 10 north of Speculator became part of NY 30, and remains that way today from Speculator, past Indian Lake and Tupper Lake and up to the Canadian Border. At one time, the highway was realigned to pass the Goodman Mountain to the west, leaving this stretch of road to be mostly forgotten and to be reclaimed by nature. During the summer of 2014, a 1.6 mile long hiking trail was approved the Adirondack Park Agency to be constructed to the summit of the 2,176 foot high Goodman Mountain. For the first 0.9 mi

Oregon State Highway 58

  Also known as the Willamette Highway No. 18, the route of Oregon State Highway 58 (OR 58) stretches some 86 miles between US 97 north of Chemult and I-5 just outside of Eugene, Oregon. A main route between the Willamette Valley region of Oregon with Central Oregon and Crater Lake National Park, the highway follows the Middle Fork Willamette River and Salt Creek for much of its route as it makes its way to and across the Cascades, cresting at 5,138 feet above sea level at Willamette Pass. That is a gain of over 4,500 in elevation from where the highway begins at I-5. The upper reaches of OR 58 are dominated by the principal pinnacle that can sometimes be seen from the highway, Diamond Peak, and three nearby lakes, Crescent, Odell and Waldo (Oregon's second largest lake). OR 58 is chock full of rivers, creeks, mountain views, hot springs and waterfalls within a short distance from the highway. OR 58 was numbered as such by the Oregon State Highway Department in 1940. OR 58 is a del