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What's coming down the pike

How I go about updating the website is very simple, I do a state at a time and between the states a gallery or a feature update. It turns out to be about a state a month. Which is fine as hobby time is mainly set to weekends and some evenings when I am on a roll.

The order is simple: SC-NC-VA-WV-PA and start again. In between, those states is when I usually do a gallery update or add vacation photos etc. It's been how I have done updates for about, I think 2-3 years now. The amount varies as sometimes you get flooded with items from a state other times you don't. It is very streaky. An example is for a while I was getting a lot of Alabama and Georgia gallery shots, so it seemed every few weeks there was another eight photos in Georgia and four for Alabama in between state updates.

If it is a lean material update in photos (since it is a photo driven site), it does give me more time to add to existing pages or do something more research specific. I may reorganize a page, add map scans or do some more research from past notes, etc.

Overall it is a great way of pacing yourself...as I have said it's a giant research project without a due date...and you don't get bored with your own site, or burned out ...as many others have had happen.

So here's what's up and coming with material that I currently have stages as of today 12/09/05: (Note: this doesnt' count what I still have to develop in 10 rolls of film and from my digital camera since last December or any other possibilites that just need a spark/time).

South Carolina: (Target Date: Possibly the end of this weekend)
- A lot of I-73 and Carolina Bays Parkway information (more on I-73).
- I will try to expand more on the Early Auto Trails in the state and maybe add some more to the US Highways page.

North Carolina: (Target Date: New Years)
- Got more photos back from Oriental. This time from another sailing trip in December of 2004.
- Got some photos of the abanonded I-85/US 29/74 connector ramps in Gastonia from Chris Curley. That will go in the Charlotte pages I think or Carolina Lost.
- Some more Greensboro Outer Loop photos from a new contributor named Billy Moore. I may try to flush out the current GSO Loop info and history...if I can find any.
- US 264's new Western Terminus from Chris Curley
- A sign of my own to add.
- I will prolly at least start a photoless - but map scan - page on the 4 US 70's in Smithfield/Selma and tie in the early plans of I-40 being extended to Morehead City.

Virginia: (Target Date: End of January)
- Cutouts and gallery photos from Mike Roberson
- Gallery shots from Bill Manning
- I may expand the US 29 Page to include the Lee Highway
- Maybe a photo or two added to the US 15 pages.

West Virginia: (Target Date: End of February)
- Corridor H information in regards to upgrading US 220 towards Cumberland, Maryland.

Pennsylvania: (target Date: End of March)
- Just updated. So the queue is currently empty, if it remains relatively so I will be adding photos of my own to PA Keystones, Covered Bridges, Sign Gallery, and what not else.

SWPARoads: (Target Date: n/a)
- I have to go through the dust of information I had researched with Jeff Kitsko the past few years. I think i may start from scratch in getting information on some roads there.

Photo Gallery:

Georgia: Four photos from JP Natsiatka...what I don't use will be passed to Steve Alpert. I will probably tie that in with South Carolina.

AL/MS/TN/DC/MO/OK: None at the present time.

Hope that gives you all an insight to how I work!

--Adam

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