Skip to main content

California State Route 225; the Zombie Highway of Santa Barbara and presently shortest in California

This past month I visited the Santa Barbara Area and drove the many short State Highways located there.  The shortest and the strangest is the 0.081 mile California State Route 225.


As noted above CA 225 is presently only 0.081 miles in length and is located completely on Castillo Street in Santa Barbara between Montecito Street and US 101/CA 1.  Fortunately the Caltrans Post Mile Tool illustrates that CA 225 still exists despite almost being relinquished to death.



At present moment CA 225 is the shortest State Highway in California.  By the definition of actual field mileage the following State Highways are the five shortest in California:

1.  CA 225 at 0.081 miles
2.  CA 275 at 0.14 miles
3.  CA 283 at 0.36 miles
4.  CA 77 at 0.40 miles 
5.  CA 153/CA 265 at 0.50 miles each

The origin of CA 225 was back in 1933 when Legislative Route 150 was added to the State Highway system as a loop of US 101/LRN 2 between Santa Barbara east to near Montecito according to CAhighways.org.  As originally envisioned LRN 150 ran east from US 101/LRN 2 via; Modoc Avenue, Las Positas Road, Cliff Drive, Montecito Street, Castillo Street and Cabrillo Boulevard.  LRN 150 in it's original iteration can be seen on the 1935 California Division of Highways Map of Santa Barbara County.


During the 1964 State Highway Renumbering LRN 150 was assigned as CA 225 which can be seen on the 1964 State Highway Map.


According to CAhighways.org CA 225 was truncated to Castillo Street and US 101/CA 1 in 1998.  Whereas CA 225 east previously made a right turn onto Castillo it's new terminus shifted it onto a left hand turn to US 101/CA 1.  This routing can be seen on the 2005 State Highway Map.


In 2011 Legislation was introduced which authorized the relinquishment of all of the remaining CA 225 aside from the Castillo Street Interchange.  This legislation was made effective in 2013 when the California Transportation Commission authorized the relinquishment of most of CA 225 to the City of Santa Barbara.  It is likely that the Castillo Street interchange was kept as a defacto collateral facility of US 101/CA 1 but it was simply easier just to keep it as part of CA 225 rather than introduce new legislation.

I wanted to get more out of my visit to CA 225 than just a block of Castillo Street.  That being the case I decided on the 1998 variant of CA 225 and approached what would have been the start of the highway via US 101/CA 1 south at Exit 100 for Las Positas Road.





CA 225 east would have traversed Las Positas Road south to Cliff Drive.










The junction of Las Positas Road and Cliff Drive is presently configured as a roundabout.  CA 225 east would have turned onto eastbound Cliff Drive.



CA 225 would have followed Cliff Drive eastward where it becomes Montecito Street after a downward descent.












CA 225 east would have originally made a right hand turn from Montecito Street onto Castillo Street.  The 1998 variation made a left hand turn onto Castillo Street.


Ironically the present route of CA 225 on Castillo Street wasn't even part of the original variation of LRN 150.  CA 225 on Castillo Street is unsigned between Montecito Street and US 101/CA 1.  What you see below is what you get with what is left of CA 225.





Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The history of US Route 80 and Interstate 8 in California

The historic corridor of US Route 80 and Interstate 8 through the borderlands of southern California share a largely mutual history.  Both highways originated in the city of San Diego and departed the state at the Colorado River into Yuma, Arizona.  Both highways share numerous famous geographical components such as the Mountain Springs Grade and Algodones Sand Dunes.  This article serves as a comprehensive history of the combined US Route 80/Interstate 8 corridor in California from the tolled stage route era of the nineteenth century to the development of the modern freeway.   The blog cover photo features US Route 80 along the Mountains Springs Grade through In-Ko-Pah Gorge during late 1920s.  This photo is part of the Caltrans McCurry Collection. Part 1; the history of US Route 80 and Interstate 8 in California US Route 80 and Interstate 8 in California share a largely mutual history.  The backstory of both highways is tied heavily to the corridors of the Old Spanish Trail, Legisl

The Central Freeway of San Francisco (US Route 101)

The Central Freeway is a 1.2-mile elevated limited access corridor in the city of San Francisco.  As presently configured the Central Freeway connects from the end of the Bayshore Freeway to Market Street.  The Central Freeway carries the mainline of northbound US Route 101 from the Bayshore Freeway to Mission Street. The Central Freeway has origins with the establishment of Legislative Route Number 223 and is heavily tied to the history of the once proposed Panhandle Freeway.  The Central Freeway between the Bayshore Freeway and Mission Street was completed during 1955.  The corridor was extended to a one-way couplet located at Turk Street and Golden Gate Avenue in 1959 which served to connect US Route 101 to Van Ness Avenue.  The Central Freeway was damaged by the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and has since been truncated to Market Street.   The Central Freeway as pictured on the blog cover was featured in the May/June 1959 California Highways & Public Works.  The scan below is fro

The Midway Palm and Pine of US Route 99

Along modern day California State Route 99 south of Avenue 11 just outside the City limits of Madera one can find the Midway Palm and Pine in the center median of the freeway.  The Midway Palm and Pine denotes the halfway point between the Mexican Border and Oregon State Line on what was US Route 99.  The Midway Palm is intended to represent Southern California whereas the Midway Pine is intended to represent Northern California.  Pictured above the Midway Palm and Pine can be seen from the northbound lanes of the California State Route 99 Freeway.   This blog is part of the larger Gribblenation US Route 99 Page.  For more information pertaining to the other various segments of US Route 99 and it's three-digit child routes check out the link the below. Gribblenation US Route 99 Page The history of the Midway Palm and Pine The true timeframe for when the Midway Palm and Pine (originally a Deadora Cedar Tree) were planted is unknown.  In fact, the origin of the Midway Palm and Pine w