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Walkway Over The Hudson



It's a bit late, but I thought I'd post it anyway.

A few of us got together on 3rd October 2009 to check out the rehabilitated Poughkeepsie Railway bridge over the Hudson River. This is a wonderful new attraction that is well worth the visit. You can walk across the longest pedestrian bridge in the world and see some fairly nice scenery-like the Mid-Hudson bridge, here, or you can just lollygag and enjoy the day.

Being an ECHM meet, there were some preliminaries. Smilin' John OI! Krakoff, Doug Kerr, and Steve Alpert came over the night before for BEER! Sleep, and to have a look at some of my interesting road-related items.

The next day, there was a pre-meet where we had a look around Rosendale and found our way out onto the New York Central Trestle over the Rondout Creek , as well as exploring the mystery of Ulster County Highway 25-which has a significant number of State-installed signs, as well as Perrines Covered bridge, and a used-to-be street in Kingston.

Then it was off to the Walkway, which was opening that day, and we were among the first (of many) to cross from Highland to Poughkeepsie on foot. A first for me, since I won't go out on the Mid-Hudson due to an irrational fear of walking on suspension bridges(I never have figured that out).

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