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Gov. Perdue's BRILLIANT! new Yadkin River Bridge Idea


...and the idea: Rename the bridge.

In the never ending search for every highway dollar she can find, NC Governor Beverly Perdue is renaming the Yadkin River Bridge on Interstate 85, the Interstate 85 bridge. Why? So it stresses the regional importance of the aging structure.

So I guess the name change will put NC's bid for $300 million in stimulus/TIGER funds to build a new bridge over the top.

No word if Governor Perdue came up with this idea after a few pints of Guiness.

Story Links:
New effort to replace Yadkin River Bridge includes 'rebranding' ---WBTV
When is the Yadkin River Bridge not a bridge? ---The Meck Deck

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